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> Long Range Spring 2018--Outlooks, Thoughts, and Discussions, Spring is only one season away
ClicheVortex2014
post Feb 19 2018, 12:13 AM
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QUOTE(jdrenken @ Feb 19 2018, 12:09 AM) *
What's the consensus of volcanic eruptions in the equatorial region for climate impacts?

Probably not high enough to mess with anything. 7.5km is only about 400mb. I think it's gotta go up into the Stratosphere for an impact.


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Meteorology undergrad at Ohio University (weather on campus)

Historic weather events in the Ohio Valley:
- The 1974 Super Outbreak (read more)
- The 2012 "Super" Derecho
- The Great Blizzard of 1978

2018 Weather for Cincinnati

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kpk33x
post Feb 19 2018, 12:24 AM
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QUOTE(ClicheVortex2014 @ Feb 19 2018, 01:13 AM) *
Probably not high enough to mess with anything. 7.5km is only about 400mb. I think it's gotta go up into the Stratosphere for an impact.


+1
And there is a lag to the effects if they do come, they would be noted next winter. Pinatubo erupted June 1991, you started seeing nice sunsets in September, but main impacts were spring/summer 1992.


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jdrenken
post Feb 19 2018, 12:36 AM
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QUOTE(kpk33x @ Feb 18 2018, 11:24 PM) *
+1
And there is a lag to the effects if they do come, they would be noted next winter. Pinatubo erupted June 1991, you started seeing nice sunsets in September, but main impacts were spring/summer 1992.


Ah... thanks for the info from both of you!


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ClicheVortex2014
post Feb 19 2018, 01:12 PM
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Going back to my Climo days, what happens in volcanic winters is the large volume of ash gets locked in the Stratosphere and creates some sort of a greenhouse-like effect, except it blocks energy from passing through the Stratosphere into the Troposphere instead of blocking energy from exiting the Troposphere through the Stratosphere.

The fact that this eruption occurred near the equator complicates the situation even if the ash did make it to the Stratosphere. I'm not sure which hemisphere the ash would go to, since the winds around the equator are so weak and chaotic throughout the atmosphere. That would be interesting to see.

This post has been edited by ClicheVortex2014: Feb 19 2018, 01:14 PM


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Meteorology undergrad at Ohio University (weather on campus)

Historic weather events in the Ohio Valley:
- The 1974 Super Outbreak (read more)
- The 2012 "Super" Derecho
- The Great Blizzard of 1978

2018 Weather for Cincinnati

Days >90: 0 (Last: 9/24/17)
Days <0: 5 (Last 1/6/18) (Lowest: -7)
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Fire/Rescue
post Feb 20 2018, 10:55 AM
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So now that the snow has melted away I noticed in my flower beds this morning the Tulip and Daffodils are popping thru, nothing out of the ordinary however for mid February around Baltimore's 95 corridor.

Just really gets ya thinking SPRING is not that farrr away when the flowers begin to imerge and your seeing on television your favorite baseball team working out with Spring training.

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idecline
post Feb 20 2018, 03:34 PM
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...from USGS...https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/gas_climate.html

Attached File  img3273_900w_690h.png ( 448.37K ) Number of downloads: 0


QUOTE
Volcanoes can affect the Earth's climate.
Volcanoes can impact climate change. During major explosive eruptions huge amounts of volcanic gas, aerosol droplets, and ash are injected into the stratosphere. Injected ash falls rapidly from the stratosphere -- most of it is removed within several days to weeks -- and has little impact on climate change. But volcanic gases like sulfur dioxide can cause global cooling, while volcanic carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, has the potential to promote global warming.

Sulfate aerosols can cool the climate and deplete Earth's ozone layer.
Volcanic gases react with the atmosphere in various ways; the conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfuric acid has the most significant impact on climate.
(Click image to view full size.)
Volcanic gases react with the atmosphere in various ways; the conversion of sulfur dioxide (SO2) to sulfuric acid (H2SO4) has the most significant impact on climate.


The most significant climate impacts from volcanic injections into the stratosphere come from the conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfuric acid, which condenses rapidly in the stratosphere to form fine sulfate aerosols. The aerosols increase the reflection of radiation from the Sun back into space, cooling the Earth's lower atmosphere or troposphere.

Several eruptions during the past century have caused a decline in the average temperature at the Earth's surface of up to half a degree (Fahrenheit scale) for periods of one to three years. The climactic eruption of Mount Pinatubo on June 15, 1991, was one of the largest eruptions of the twentieth century and injected a 20-million ton (metric scale) sulfur dioxide cloud into the stratosphere at an altitude of more than 20 miles. The Pinatubo cloud was the largest sulfur dioxide cloud ever observed in the stratosphere since the beginning of such observations by satellites in 1978. It caused what is believed to be the largest aerosol disturbance of the stratosphere in the twentieth century, though probably smaller than the disturbances from eruptions of Krakatau in 1883 and Tambora in 1815. Consequently, it was a standout in its climate impact and cooled the Earth's surface for three years following the eruption, by as much as 1.3 degrees F at the height of the impact.

The large 1783-1784 Laki fissure eruption in Iceland released a staggering amount more sulfur dioxide than Pinatubo (approximately 120-million ton vs. 20). Although the two eruptions were significantly different in length and style, the added atmospheric SO2 caused regional cooling of Europe and North America by similar amounts for similar periods of time....(continued)






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ClicheVortex2014
post Yesterday, 05:32 PM
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Love watching spring come in. You wouldn't see these kind of systems in late December or January. Referring not only to the rich moisture despite the relatively weak system, but also the dryline that extends almost to the IA/IL/MO tristate area.




This post has been edited by ClicheVortex2014: Yesterday, 05:33 PM


--------------------
Meteorology undergrad at Ohio University (weather on campus)

Historic weather events in the Ohio Valley:
- The 1974 Super Outbreak (read more)
- The 2012 "Super" Derecho
- The Great Blizzard of 1978

2018 Weather for Cincinnati

Days >90: 0 (Last: 9/24/17)
Days <0: 5 (Last 1/6/18) (Lowest: -7)
Marginal risks: 1 (Last: 2/15/18)
Slight risks: 0 (Last: 8/22/17)
Enhanced risks: 0 (Last: 11/5/17)
Moderate risks: 0 (Last: 6/22/16)
High risks: 0 (Last: 11/17/13)
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