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> Winter 2017-18
snowgeek93
post Nov 2 2017, 05:39 PM
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All I know is that we average about 7cm of snow in Markham during the month of November so I'm definitely anxious to see the first flakes or accumulating snow this month.


--------------------
Thornhill, Ontario Snowfall (Buttonville Airport):

2017/2018: 151.5cm (Weak La Nina)
2016/2017: 142.6cm (Weak La Nina)
2015/2016: 96.4cm (Strong El Nino)
2014/2015: 118.7cm (Weak El Nino)
2013/2014: 184.8cm (Neutral)
2012/2013: 151.6cm (Neutral)
2011/2012: 99.9cm (Weak La Nina)
2010/2011: 168.1cm (Moderate La Nina)
2009/2010: 71.3cm (Moderate El Nino)
2008/2009: 253cm (Weak La Nina)
2007/2008: 251.6cm (Moderate La Nina)
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Jeremy404
post Nov 2 2017, 11:09 PM
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We had some wet flakes in Guelph on Tuesday fwiw
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PGM
post Nov 6 2017, 11:26 AM
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Some observations I've gathered from reading, not really sure what they mean.

- Significant early snow pack as far south as western Nebraska, extending northeast through Minnesota and central Wisconsin into northern Ontario.

- Continuing on snow pack: it is at a 12-year record high, currently beating pace with the winter of 2013-14.

- Very cold conditions for early November across the Prairies, northern Plains. Lots of places below 0*F this morning in northwestern Minnesota. I'm sure snow pack allows for some of this.

- Saw somewhere the polar vortex is not split like it has been other years. Does this go against the whole cold winter thing?
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MrMusic
post Nov 6 2017, 05:25 PM
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despite some long range models hinting at a more mild winter around here, the new Euro weeklies have a cold 4-6 week look to them....


--------------------
Winter 2017-2018

December 12, 2017: 10cm - Welcome back winter!!
13: 5cm
14: 12cm
22: 9cm
23: 9cm
24: 16cm

JAN 2018
1: 5cm
8: 10cm
15: 6cm
29: 16cm

FEB 2018
8: 13cm
10-11: 18cm



Winter 2016-2017

Dec 2016: 30cm
Jan 2017: 5cm
Feb 2017: 7cm
March 2017: 35cm!! Finally!

Days with snow on the ground: 25
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snowgeek93
post Nov 6 2017, 05:51 PM
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I for one am looking forward to seeing some snow. The darkness is settling in now and I need something to make that better lol.


--------------------
Thornhill, Ontario Snowfall (Buttonville Airport):

2017/2018: 151.5cm (Weak La Nina)
2016/2017: 142.6cm (Weak La Nina)
2015/2016: 96.4cm (Strong El Nino)
2014/2015: 118.7cm (Weak El Nino)
2013/2014: 184.8cm (Neutral)
2012/2013: 151.6cm (Neutral)
2011/2012: 99.9cm (Weak La Nina)
2010/2011: 168.1cm (Moderate La Nina)
2009/2010: 71.3cm (Moderate El Nino)
2008/2009: 253cm (Weak La Nina)
2007/2008: 251.6cm (Moderate La Nina)
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travis3000
post Nov 6 2017, 05:52 PM
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Like expected, November will be a slightly below normal month in Southern ON. December should also be the same IMO.

First snow potential comes this week for many. Friday will have highs around -3C to -4C across Southern ON, the coldest so far. It will feel like winter. LES bands will set up (nothing serious) but it will be enough to turn some regions white W and N of the city.

Also looking at this coming weekend for some wet snow which could accumulate in areas on higher ground. GFS sticks to mostly rain, CMC throws out more snow potential.

This post has been edited by travis3000: Nov 6 2017, 06:26 PM


--------------------
Barrie ,ON 2017/2018 Snowfall:
Alliston in ( )
October: 2cm (0cm)
November: 30cm (13cm)
December: 70.5cm (52cm)
January: 49.5cm (27cm)
February: 39cm (30cm)
March: 20cm (18cm)
April: 33cm (19cm)
SEASON TOTAL...
Barrie: 244cm
Alliston: 159cm


--
Alliston history
2016/2017: 148cm
2015/2016 Total: 121cm
2014/2015 Total: 113.5cm
2013/2014 Total: 200cm
2012/2013: 140cm
2011/2012: 103cm
2010/2011: 213.5cm
2009/2010: 97cm
2008/2009: 232cm
2007/2008: 291cm
2006/2007: 84.8cm
LAST 11 YEAR AVERAGE: 158cm

Travis
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MrMusic
post Nov 6 2017, 08:12 PM
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With the cold temps predicted for Friday, that will end our streak of days above 5 degrees. Looks like 2017 will end up with the 3rd longest run of days above 5 in history.


--------------------
Winter 2017-2018

December 12, 2017: 10cm - Welcome back winter!!
13: 5cm
14: 12cm
22: 9cm
23: 9cm
24: 16cm

JAN 2018
1: 5cm
8: 10cm
15: 6cm
29: 16cm

FEB 2018
8: 13cm
10-11: 18cm



Winter 2016-2017

Dec 2016: 30cm
Jan 2017: 5cm
Feb 2017: 7cm
March 2017: 35cm!! Finally!

Days with snow on the ground: 25
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Khaled
post Nov 16 2017, 07:57 AM
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IRI is predicting a colder than normal and wetter than normal Jan-March for South Western Ontario.

However, it seems that December will be warmer and drier (or average) based on Dec-Feb maps (with December added, the colder and wetter trend does not exist.

This post has been edited by Khaled: Nov 16 2017, 09:02 AM
Attached File(s)
Attached File  JFM18_NAm_pcp.gif ( 55.52K ) Number of downloads: 3
Attached File  JFM18_NAm_tmp.gif ( 50.91K ) Number of downloads: 1
Attached File  DJF18_NAm_pcp.gif ( 55.09K ) Number of downloads: 1
Attached File  DJF18_NAm_tmp.gif ( 49.29K ) Number of downloads: 3
 
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sledder
post Nov 16 2017, 03:49 PM
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Major flurries (squalls) blowing through south Muskoka right now. But they don’t show up on the radar.
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snowgeek93
post Nov 20 2017, 07:07 PM
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Winter Forecast from Anthony Farnell of Global News. He's thinking snowier for the GTA this year... mellow.gif

https://twitter.com/AnthonyFarnell/status/932605134168887297


--------------------
Thornhill, Ontario Snowfall (Buttonville Airport):

2017/2018: 151.5cm (Weak La Nina)
2016/2017: 142.6cm (Weak La Nina)
2015/2016: 96.4cm (Strong El Nino)
2014/2015: 118.7cm (Weak El Nino)
2013/2014: 184.8cm (Neutral)
2012/2013: 151.6cm (Neutral)
2011/2012: 99.9cm (Weak La Nina)
2010/2011: 168.1cm (Moderate La Nina)
2009/2010: 71.3cm (Moderate El Nino)
2008/2009: 253cm (Weak La Nina)
2007/2008: 251.6cm (Moderate La Nina)
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snowgeek93
post Nov 20 2017, 08:47 PM
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TWN is out with their winter forecast as well:

https://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/arti...-la-nina/89578/

QUOTE
Ontario and Quebec

A classic Canadian winter is expected for this region with an active storm track bringing above average snowfall across central and southern regions. There is also a heightened threat for freezing rain at times across the south.

A stormy weather pattern could bring the Greater Toronto Area its snowiest winter in a decade. In fact, it is interest to note that there are some similarities in the global weather pattern between this year and the winter of 2007-2008, which brought Pearson airport its snowiest winter on record. The cold will be the bigger story across northwestern Ontario with colder than normal temperatures expected. However, the pattern will relax at times with an extended period of milder weather expected mid-winter.


--------------------
Thornhill, Ontario Snowfall (Buttonville Airport):

2017/2018: 151.5cm (Weak La Nina)
2016/2017: 142.6cm (Weak La Nina)
2015/2016: 96.4cm (Strong El Nino)
2014/2015: 118.7cm (Weak El Nino)
2013/2014: 184.8cm (Neutral)
2012/2013: 151.6cm (Neutral)
2011/2012: 99.9cm (Weak La Nina)
2010/2011: 168.1cm (Moderate La Nina)
2009/2010: 71.3cm (Moderate El Nino)
2008/2009: 253cm (Weak La Nina)
2007/2008: 251.6cm (Moderate La Nina)
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Apocalypse
post Nov 20 2017, 09:12 PM
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Looks like they expect above average snowfall for most of the country.

QUOTE
British Columbia

Overall, this winter will not be as persistent or as severe as it was last year, especially for areas near the coast, where near normal temperatures are expected. Colder than normal temperatures are expected across the eastern half of the province. While winter weather started early in November, it looks like extended periods of cold weather will be more likely during the second half of the winter season with a tendency towards milder conditions during December.

Excellent ski conditions are expected for much of the season, but periods of milder weather could put a strain on North Shore ski areas at times, especially during December.

The Prairies

The Prairies will experience the harshest winter weather in the country with below normal temperatures and above normal snowfall for much of the region, especially across the south. However, the frigid pattern is expected to relax at times and above normal snowfall is good news for areas that experienced drought conditions during the summer.

Ontario and Quebec

A classic Canadian winter is expected for this region with an active storm track bringing above average snowfall across central and southern regions. There is also a heightened threat for freezing rain at times across the south.

A stormy weather pattern could bring the Greater Toronto Area its snowiest winter in a decade. In fact, it is interest to note that there are some similarities in the global weather pattern between this year and the winter of 2007-2008, which brought Pearson airport its snowiest winter on record. The cold will be the bigger story across northwestern Ontario with colder than normal temperatures expected. However, the pattern will relax at times with an extended period of milder weather expected mid-winter.

Atlantic Canada

An active winter is expected across this region with above normal precipitation and near to above normal temperatures. Temperatures should still be cold enough for an abundance of snow and ice, but periods of milder weather and rain will keep the snowbanks from getting as high as they did during the infamous winter of 2014-2015.

Northern Canada

Near normal to below normal temperatures are expected for Whitehorse and Yellowknife with near to above normal temperature for Iqaluit. Milder than normal temperatures are expected for most of Nunavut. Most of Canada should see near normal amounts of snowfall, but below normal precipitation is expected for parts of the Yukon.


This post has been edited by Apocalypse: Nov 20 2017, 09:12 PM
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stuffradio
post Nov 21 2017, 12:43 AM
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Hopefully I get some snow. Even though last year was pretty epic, I'm still snow deprived.
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Bob and Karen
post Nov 21 2017, 12:56 AM
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QUOTE(Apocalypse @ Nov 20 2017, 09:12 PM) *
Looks like they expect above average snowfall for most of the country.


As snow lovers, that is great news – hopefully it comes true. Our family travels all the way from southeastern Pennsylvania to Ontario’s Algonquin Provincial Park each January to camp (“glamp”) in our 4 season tent. We thoroughly enjoy the snow, activities, beauty, and serenity that the park provides... a much needed break from the stress of life.

We shared our experience with CTV Barrie and CBC...

http://barrie.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=1043266

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/podcasts/ontario/ontario-morning/
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Ottawa blizzard
post Nov 21 2017, 07:15 PM
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The fact that so many weather outlets are on board with the call for a "classic Canadian winter" gives me pause for concern. Rarely does a winter live up to pre-forecasted hype. On the contrary, the most memorable winters seem to happen when we least expect them to. The Euro weeklies are not promising for early December - and certainly don't look like December 2007.

Time will tell, of course.
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snowball
post Nov 22 2017, 08:34 PM
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QUOTE(Ottawa blizzard @ Nov 21 2017, 07:15 PM) *
The fact that so many weather outlets are on board with the call for a "classic Canadian winter" gives me pause for concern. Rarely does a winter live up to pre-forecasted hype. On the contrary, the most memorable winters seem to happen when we least expect them to. The Euro weeklies are not promising for early December - and certainly don't look like December 2007.

Time will tell, of course.


If you look at the pattern in place right now it's a conveyer belt from the west and la Nina in right conditions will keep this in place. Conditions matching 2007, the pattern simply didn't move and we kept getting storm after storm. I am as pessimistic as the next person but been watching it for a few weeks and it seems similar. I can see this coming to fruition with more cold air. Not polar vortex air which isn't supposed to hit either. Also of not this you will see doozers as Texas lows can join up for a double whammy we saw that a couple times in 2007 as well
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sledder
post Nov 22 2017, 08:56 PM
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Sure hope you’re right
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Ottawa blizzard
post Nov 22 2017, 10:02 PM
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QUOTE(snowball @ Nov 22 2017, 08:34 PM) *
If you look at the pattern in place right now it's a conveyer belt from the west and la Nina in right conditions will keep this in place. Conditions matching 2007, the pattern simply didn't move and we kept getting storm after storm. I am as pessimistic as the next person but been watching it for a few weeks and it seems similar. I can see this coming to fruition with more cold air. Not polar vortex air which isn't supposed to hit either. Also of not this you will see doozers as Texas lows can join up for a double whammy we saw that a couple times in 2007 as well

Good point. I just think that outlets such as The Weather Network, as well as Weatherbell in the US, need to have a stormy winter in order to draw viewers and subscribers. That's why I think both outlets are hyping this upcoming winter. I've heard that EC is less bullish on us getting a big winter, perhaps due to them bein government funded, and thus not needing to rely on a viewer/subscriber base. Hence, less hype.
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snowball
post Nov 22 2017, 10:11 PM
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QUOTE(Ottawa blizzard @ Nov 22 2017, 10:02 PM) *
Good point. I just think that outlets such as The Weather Network, as well as Weatherbell in the US, need to have a stormy winter in order to draw viewers and subscribers. That's why I think both outlets are hyping this upcoming winter. I've heard that EC is less bullish on us getting a big winter, perhaps due to them bein government funded, and thus not needing to rely on a viewer/subscriber base. Hence, less hype.


I could see that, don't get me wrong I think it's easier to hype the winter especially for outlets like weather network and global. But there is also a consensus there and if you get a chance watch Dr. Doug he knows his stuff, la Nina with a warm north passage is the key factor drawing comparisons to 2007. I'm buying into it. That and I think we have even more opportunity for lake effect compared to 10 years ago but could be wrong. The setup lends itself to the left side of the Appalachians vs what we've seen in recent years where storms have a more preferred track up the right side and up the coast. Just my two cents I'm drinking the koolaid though smile.gif
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snowball
post Nov 22 2017, 10:15 PM
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QUOTE(snowball @ Nov 22 2017, 10:11 PM) *
I could see that, don't get me wrong I think it's easier to hype the winter especially for outlets like weather network and global. But there is also a consensus there and if you get a chance watch Dr. Doug he knows his stuff, la Nina with a warm north passage is the key factor drawing comparisons to 2007. I'm buying into it. That and I think we have even more opportunity for lake effect compared to 10 years ago but could be wrong. The setup lends itself to the left side of the Appalachians vs what we've seen in recent years where storms have a more preferred track up the right side and up the coast. Just my two cents I'm drinking the koolaid though smile.gif


And just to add the fall of that year was very similar
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