Login to AccuWeather.com Premium Login to AccuWeather.com Professional Login to AccuWeather.com RadarPlus AccuWeather.com

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

8 Pages V  « < 6 7 8  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Eastern Kentucky Observations and forecasts, Eastern Kentucky Weather
sgtmaj
post Nov 26 2010, 04:59 AM
Post #141




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





A cold wet black Friday maybe a snow shower, then clearing tonite.


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 2 2010, 07:46 PM
Post #142




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





The clipper system moving in here on Saturday. This is setting up as a general 1"-3" snowfall for eastern Kentucky from Saturday into Sunday morning. Low pressure will develop in the plains Friday and work southeastward through Missouri then east across Tennessee and off the Carolina coastline by Saturday night. Snow will break out along and north of the track of this low with the potential for a decent snowfall for us.

Once this system moves through, there will be a period of up -slope snow that is likely from Sunday through, at least, Wednesday. Temps are going to go into the tank with highs only in the 20s during this time with lows down into the low and mid teens. Winds are going to be very gusty as well and single digit wind chills will be possible at times.




--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 5 2010, 10:14 AM
Post #143




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





With very cold air moving in... we will maximize the snowfall ratios as it won't take very much moisture at all to produce snow.The heaviest snow showers and squalls will reduce visibilites and lay down quick accumulations. Winds will be gusty and blow the fluffy snow around.Here is a rough estimate of the amount of new snow that may fall over the next few days...Keep in mind... we are talking about snow showers and squalls so accumulations will vary from place to place
Attached File  Special17.png ( 53.36K ) Number of downloads: 0


This pattern shows no signs of breaking as far as I can see and that means we have a lot of cold and snow chances through December and likely into early January. This round of arctic cold will ease a bit by Thursday and Friday... but temps remain on the cold side. A new clipper should be working in from the northwest and could bring a mix/snow to snow situation by Friday. That is one to watch. Colder air will follow that for the weekend as we await the arrival of an arctic front about a week from now. There is a strong signal showing up for an arctic wave to develop along this front and sweep eastward across the region. If this is the case... we will have to be on guard as these waves can sometimes blow up into big storms across the eastern part of the country
Around the 12 of December the Models are showing a Big Storm Here
It could be be the Big Daddy, Keep checking back for up-dates.


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 6 2010, 10:49 PM
Post #144




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





The weekend storm REALLY has my attention with a MAJOR arctic blast to follow later Sunday into early next week. That blast should make the current weather seem mild. This is an important system to watch as it will have an impact on the track of the storm behind it. If this is a robust clipper,it should force the next storm farther south. Low pressure will be coming out of the plains states Saturday. This low should ride into the lower Ohio Valley bringing a swath of snow, rain and mix.The first low should weaken out as a deep trough continues to dive in behind it. The should spawn a strong low somewhere just to our southeast or east. This should become a major storm as it rides northward along the east slopes of the Appalachian mountains.

What does all that mean for us? Well...

Big Daddy ?????????????????????????????????????????????????


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 6 2010, 11:07 PM
Post #145




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





This weekend a storm will move from the northern Plains into the Ohio Valley, then redevelop off the mid-Atlantic coast.The DGEX model is showing on the 13th a major snowstorm (Big Daddy) hitting the mid-Atlantic and Appalachians.
Attached File  156830_183022148378169_135790633101321_668563_1084546_n.jpg ( 141.6K ) Number of downloads: 0


This post has been edited by sgtmaj: Dec 6 2010, 11:10 PM
Attached File(s)
 


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 7 2010, 11:47 PM
Post #146




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





here is the Latest
Attached File  Big_Daddy.bmp ( 766.65K ) Number of downloads: 9


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 13 2010, 10:12 AM
Post #147




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





The situation for Wednesday through Friday morning is especially worth looking at because of the potential for ice to go along with snow. A fairly weak low pressure is expected to roll eastward across the lower Ohio Valley or Tennessee Valley late Wednesday into Thursday. This system will throw moisture into the region which is likely to fall into low level arctic cold air. How deep the cold air is will determine the type of precipitation you will get where you live.
The NAM shows the potential I am talking about
Attached File  NAMSnow22.png ( 69.21K ) Number of downloads: 0


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 14 2010, 11:19 AM
Post #148




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





A Winter Storm Watch is now out for much of Kentucky from late Wednesday through Thursday for the possibility of significant snow and ice accumulations.There will be a weak wave of low pressure crossing the Tennessee Valley Thursday that will throw overrunning moisture northward into our region. We will still have low level arctic cold air in place as a layer of slightly warmer and moist air moves in. This will produce a swath of snow and freezing rain into the region. Who gets what and how much remains to be seen and there could be a sharp northern cutoff to the heaviest band of snow and ice and we will have to wait and see where that sets up or if it sets up. Looking ahead to the weekend, many of the models have been pointing toward a big storm rolling out of the deep south and up the east coast.


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 21 2010, 07:05 AM
Post #149




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





WeatherAlarmô!
Alert Type: SnowTotal Amount: 4.6 in Occurring:Dec 24 | Dec 25
Where ever you are on Christmas, you will be there for awhile. The 4.6 inches is very Conservative right now. The weather models are making this a monster. We shall see. Don't get too attached to that map as it is only a snapshot in time of what ONE model run...
Attached File  GFSSnowfall9.png ( 33.33K ) Number of downloads: 0


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 23 2010, 11:43 AM
Post #150




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





Latest Models are showing 6 to 8 inches of snow for Christmas Eve into Christmas. You can see this from the GFS Model Below. The Nam is saying the same thing and the Euro is showing a monster. I been studing all three models I will say 4 to 6. Snow should break out west to east Christmas Eve and continue through Christmas Day. This should drop a moderate accumulation of snow with the potential for a few to several inches during this time frame.The upper level low will then go to work Christmas Night through Monday morning and add more snow to the Christmas totals. This is the snow that will fall into a VERY cold atmosphere leading to high snow to liquid ratios.
Attached File  GFSSnowfall13.png ( 21.95K ) Number of downloads: 0


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 25 2010, 12:01 AM
Post #151




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





A streak of snow will be moving toward parts of Kentucky Tonight. This is not the main batch of snow as that will arrive from west to east this evening and overnight. Steady snows will develop this evening and continue into Christmas Day. A general 4" of snow will be likely across the area. Roads will likely become snow covered in many areas leading to a slow go for holiday travelers.The snow will become lighter during the afternoon as a wave of low pressure passes off to our southeast. A very strong upper level low will then settle in across the Ohio Valley from Christmas Night through Sunday and into early Monday. This is a stout system that will produce widespread snow showers and squalls during this time.The snow may come down at a good clip for several hours Sunday into Sunday evening. More accumulating snows are likely. As far as snowfall is concerned... I have broken it down into two periods. The first is from this evening through Christmas Day and the second shows everything that falls from tonight through Monday.

Here ya go...

Attached File  Special28.png ( 44.87K ) Number of downloads: 0



Attached File  Special29.png ( 46.17K ) Number of downloads: 0


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Dec 26 2010, 10:24 PM
Post #152




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





A strong upper level low will be over our heads today and will combine with a nice cyclonic flow to produce widespread snow showers and squalls this afternoon into the overnight. The greatest emphasis will be along and south of Interstate 64 into the mountains. Additional accumulations today and tonight will range from up to an inch in parts of Ohio to as much as 6" across southern and eastern parts of the state.
Where does the weather pattern go from here?
Monday will see snow showers and flurries winding down with highs in the 20s.
The pattern for the end of next week is actually going to warm up, but only for a few days before the cold comes right back in. Before the milder temps shoot in here, watch the period from Wednesday night into Thursday morning as it can produce some light snow or light freezing rain ahead of this mild air push. Showers would then take over for Thursday with a few lingering into the last day of the year. Highs for New Year's Eve day will head into the 50s. A powerful storm will take shape across the plains states and move into the upper midwest into New Year's Day. This may produce a blizzard on its backside with widespread showers and some thunderstorms ahead of it. This will especially be the case along a cold front that will slam through here late on day one of 2011. The European Model has a good look at this. Wow... talk about your clash of air masses! Thunder and gusty winds will be a good bet around here as the front blows through. Behind the front, temps will tank once again as we head back into a much colder than normal pattern. This looks to be a case of the pattern we have been in reloading after a two or three day break. As a matter of fact... the map above looks similar to the Thanksgiving front that started the change into this historical December cold and snow pattern. So New Years Day will be warm 50's but stand by the 7th Of January we do this all over again!
Attached File  Euro118.png ( 41.73K ) Number of downloads: 0


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Jan 4 2011, 10:47 PM
Post #153




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





The another clipper diving in for Thursday night through Friday continues to show up a bit stronger on each model run. The models are spitting out some decent snowfall with this. One thing to keep in mind is we should see some pretty good snow ratios setting up with this meaning this could be an overachiever.What the models show for the combined snowfall from Wednesday through Friday is 4 th 6 inches.With arctic air spilling in with the clipper, temps this weekend hit bottom
A complex storm will be rolling out of the southern plains states Sunday into Monday. This is going to be a tough forecast until the models can get into some agreement on how it all plays out in terms of track of the low and just how many lows we will have to track. Early odds favor snow breaking out from west to east later Sunday into Monday as one low moves toward the Tennessee Valley. This low would then give way to a more powerful low to our southeast and east that rides up the coast. A scenario like that means everybody gets snow again. This is a certainty as this is a complex system. One thing for sure, arctic air is going to be moving in behind the departing storm and will get FRIGID around here for a long time to come. There will also be a few more systems we will have to watch for in the coming weeks that can blow up into big storms. Dec was the Pulse of winter, Now you you will see the heart of it


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Jan 7 2011, 11:39 PM
Post #154




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





Just for fun... here is the GFS snowfall forecast through next Tuesday...
Let me caution you... that is only a snapshot of what one run of one model is saying and will change many times between now and early next week.
Attached File  GFS.bmp ( 733.9K ) Number of downloads: 12


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Jan 15 2011, 07:26 AM
Post #155




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





Good Saturday everyone. We are now at the halfway point of meteorological winter, which runs from December 1 through February 28. The first half has been a memorable one with record setting cold and snow . The second half looks to provide more of the same with the potential for the worst of the winter yet to come. Sometimes I am very good reading these models and there are times I really suck at it. Itís a hobby I like to do. I am going to go out on the limb on this next week because I see something that is not on the models as of yet. I do know one thing for sure it is going to get cold for the next weekend. Today will feature an increase in clouds and winds as temps warm well into the 30s. A clipper works in later this evening and overnight and will bring a batch of light snow and flurries with it. This won't amount to very much at all... but some colder air will move in for Sunday as highs come back down into the upper 20s and low 30s.. A system will be diving into the Ohio Valley and Great Lakes late Monday into Tuesday and will bring some light precipitation to much of our region. Odds favor a touch of frozen stuff for some at the beginning of the event Monday. Temps should inch above freezing for much of Monday night into Tuesday leading to some lights rains. A cold front would then swing through late Tuesday with a big drop in temps and a switch to snow showers and squalls that would last into Wednesday morning. That would be a nice little shot of arctic air moving in for the middle of the week and may be a tease for what is to come late in the week into next weekend.
Here is what are not on the models yet and I am going on the limb about . I do know MAJOR blast of arctic air invading much of the eastern half of the country. I feel this blast may be ushered in by a significant winter storm that could impact our area. What I think will happen is low pressure from Texas on Wednesday into central Georgia by Thursday. If this happens a nice little inverted trough will come into our area. That low then turns the corner up the east coast on Friday as brutal arctic air dives in behind it. This solution would lay down a lot nice snow around here that would be followed by sub zero temps.
Ok letís see if I am a Hero or a Zero on this one
Storm or no storm, some wicked cold showing up for the end of the week into next weekend.
Attached File  untitled.bmp ( 323.63K ) Number of downloads: 6


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Jan 21 2011, 09:12 PM
Post #156




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





To early to call but you might want to see the following site to vertify what I am seeing. http://www.wsaz.com/blogs/chrisbaileysblog/Arctic_Hold_Takes_Hold_Major_114347904.html


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtmaj
post Feb 5 2011, 09:16 PM
Post #157




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 349
Joined: 20-December 08
From: Eastern Kentucky
Member No.: 16,624





Monday: Some rain showers. Mostly cloudy and breezy. Turning colder late. Rain to snow showers by Monday night and Tuesday. Highs in the mid 40s Monday and upper 20s Tuesday. A light snow accumulation is possible.

It remains cold Wednesday but dry. Highs in the 20s. Lows in the teens. More snow on Thursday as a southern storm develops. If it comes north we will get a significant snowfall. But if it goes farther south, we get less snow. At this point, it looks like the area most favored for snow would be areas south and east of the Ohio River.


--------------------
Love the Corps, Proud to Serve
Sgtmaj. Glen Ripkoski
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

8 Pages V  « < 6 7 8
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 24th October 2014 - 07:36 PM