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> Our Solar System
mmi16
post Jun 15 2011, 12:37 AM
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All right -

We know the Earth and the rest of the planets revolve individually and rotate around the Sun.

We know the Sun revolves.

Now - What is our Sun and entire solar system revolving around, as it appears to me that every 'thing' in the Universe revolves around something in accordance with the rules of gravity?


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Sovolis
post Jun 15 2011, 08:39 AM
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QUOTE(mmi16 @ Jun 15 2011, 12:37 AM) *
All right -

We know the Earth and the rest of the planets revolve individually and rotate around the Sun.

We know the Sun revolves.

Now - What is our Sun and entire solar system revolving around, as it appears to me that every 'thing' in the Universe revolves around something in accordance with the rules of gravity?



The solar system orbits the center of the galaxy at a speed of about 155miles/sec. It takes our solar system about 200-250 million years to complete 1 orbit.

This post has been edited by Sovolis: Jun 15 2011, 08:48 AM


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QUOTE(Apologistnky @ Nov 4 2010, 10:57 PM) *
A squirrel cannot carry the rabies virus... but has no trouble carrying the AK-47 assault rifle or the M72 Light Anti-tank weapon ( LAWS rocket)!! :unsure: :lol:
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Sagebrusher
post Jun 17 2011, 07:42 PM
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QUOTE(Sovolis @ Jun 15 2011, 08:39 AM) *
The solar system orbits the center of the galaxy at a speed of about 155miles/sec. It takes our solar system about 200-250 million years to complete 1 orbit.


So that is roughly 500,000 miles per hour, compared to Earth's orbital velocity around the sun of around 70,000 MPH. Makes me dizzy.
The gravitional center of the galaxy is occupied by a super-massive black hole, millions of times more massive than individual stars.
This will change if the Milky Way and Andromeda collide...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andromeda%E2%...y_Way_collision

This post has been edited by Sagebrusher: Jun 17 2011, 07:45 PM
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mmi16
post Jun 20 2011, 12:52 AM
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QUOTE(Sovolis @ Jun 15 2011, 09:39 AM) *
The solar system orbits the center of the galaxy at a speed of about 155miles/sec. It takes our solar system about 200-250 million years to complete 1 orbit.

So - if the Earth is 6B years old....then our solar system has completed approximately 24-30 orbits of the galaxy. With that being the case, do we know of the orbit take place through the same plane, each time and would that plane be horizontal, vertical or some inclation in between and what form of refreence would one use to determine the orbital inclination?


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Sagebrusher
post Jun 20 2011, 03:28 PM
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I bet we don't know what the orbital inclination is...since we have had less than 200 years to measure it. You might ask the gurus over at the Bad Astonomy forum. I do know that nearby stars are not in the exact same orbit as us, for example Alpha Centauri.

www.bautforum.com

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Bhantora
post Jul 26 2011, 09:40 PM
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It is true that there are only eight planets. However, the Solar System is made up of over 100 worlds that are every bit as fascinating. Some of these minor planets, and moons are actually larger than the planet Mercury!


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Sagebrusher
post Aug 2 2011, 02:57 PM
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QUOTE(Bhantora @ Jul 26 2011, 09:40 PM) *
It is true that there are only eight planets. However, the Solar System is made up of over 100 worlds that are every bit as fascinating. Some of these minor planets, and moons are actually larger than the planet Mercury!
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Larger than Mercury, yes, more massive, no.

Mass of Mercury:

3.30221023 kg[5]
0.055 Earths

Mass of Ganymede:

1.4819 1023 kg (0.025 Earths)[

Only Ganymede is larger by diameter than Mercury, making them the 8th and 9th largest bodies in the solar system, respectively.

Info from Wikipedia

This post has been edited by Sagebrusher: Aug 2 2011, 03:04 PM
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Weather4LA
post Aug 9 2011, 10:11 AM
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QUOTE(Bhantora @ Jul 26 2011, 09:40 PM) *
It is true that there are only eight planets. However, the Solar System is made up of over 100 worlds that are every bit as fascinating. Some of these minor planets, and moons are actually larger than the planet Mercury!
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IBS Herbs

Do we know for certain that there are 8 and ONLY 8 planets in our solar system? I think we've searched most of the area of the solar system with our telescopes, but surely we haven't seen every celestial body that revolves around our sun!


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"Who hath divided a watercourse for the overflowing of waters, or a way for the lightning of thunder; to cause it to rain on the earth, where no man is; on the wilderness, wherein there is no man; to satisfy the desolate and waste ground; and to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth? Hath the rain a father? or who hath begotten the drops of dew? Out of whose womb came the ice? and the hoary frost of heaven, who hath gendered it? The waters are hid as with a stone, and the face of the deep is frozen."
-Job 38:25-30
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Sovolis
post Aug 9 2011, 11:06 AM
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QUOTE(Weather4LA @ Aug 9 2011, 10:11 AM) *
Do we know for certain that there are 8 and ONLY 8 planets in our solar system? I think we've searched most of the area of the solar system with our telescopes, but surely we haven't seen every celestial body that revolves around our sun!



At this point discovering a new planet within our solar system isn't so much about directly observing the unknown planet with telescopes, but observing the way the other bodies in the solar system react to gravitational influence. While nothing in science is ever 100% certain, we can say with complete confidence that a body that fits the current definition of a planet shouldn't be found. We can say that because we should be able to see the gravitational influence a body that fits the definition exerts on the rest of the bodies in the solar system. It is possible that a body that fits the definition of a planet resides beyond the Kuiper Belt, but it would have to be very far away or we would already be observing the gravitational influence.

It is very likely that we will find many more proto-planets and/or dwarf planets like Pluto or Ceres in the Kuiper Belt. This is very exciting to me; more exciting than if we found a new planet. The reason it is more exciting to me is because we can learn more about the creation of all the planets from these proto-planets than we can from a fully formed planet. According to the theory of accretion (planetary creation and evolution theory) the early solar system at one time was full (perhaps hundreds) of proto-planets all orbiting the sun in varying orbits. These proto-planets were constantly colliding with each other creating larger planets, so the theory is that current proto-planets like Pluto and Ceres are left overs from the formation of the solar system.

Do we know for certain? No, but we can say with complete confidence that we shouldn't find another planet that fits the current definition of a planet. If it happens it would be a huge discovery, but the odds of us finding another planet are very slim.


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QUOTE(Apologistnky @ Nov 4 2010, 10:57 PM) *
A squirrel cannot carry the rabies virus... but has no trouble carrying the AK-47 assault rifle or the M72 Light Anti-tank weapon ( LAWS rocket)!! :unsure: :lol:
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