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> Tropical Depression 10, 5AM EDT: TD 35MPH - 1007MB - WNW @ 13MPH
Weatherjunkie
post Aug 26 2011, 05:26 PM
Post #21




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looks like the low level spin is almost completely exposed...the better convection has moved to the west

splitting the pipe as previously thought when it comes to the heavier winds...right now still sitting in 10-20 knots of shear, with much stronger to the north and south with perhaps some of the shear to the north impeding development

moved through that pocket of dry air around 30W, but shear is a bit higher than I thought it would be around the system and I thought we may have had a TS today...at this point it's bye-bye with a chance at being named IMO


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The only way of finding the limits of the possible is by going beyond them into the impossible. ~Arthur C Clarke

It is better to have people think you a fool, than to open your mouth and remove all doubt. ~Mark Twain

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Kitagrl
post Aug 26 2011, 10:58 PM
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Is it difficult for a storm to be named right behind a major storm? Does the first storm tend to eat up energy (okay sorry that's not very scientific) that the second storm needs?

I guess I'm asking how far apart two storms have to be to both be able to be named storms.


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Midwest transplant always hoping for exciting weather in Philly....
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Weatherjunkie
post Aug 27 2011, 10:48 AM
Post #23




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QUOTE(Kitagrl @ Aug 26 2011, 11:58 PM) *
Is it difficult for a storm to be named right behind a major storm? Does the first storm tend to eat up energy (okay sorry that's not very scientific) that the second storm needs?

I guess I'm asking how far apart two storms have to be to both be able to be named storms.


It shouldn't be more difficult to name a storm regardless of a preceding one. NHC needs to establish TS characteristics and that's it. Essentially they need estimated surface winds of TS strength and a closed low level circulation.

Irene and now de-activated TD 10 were very far apart, they were in separate environments, and TD 10 had about 48 hours from Wednesday to Friday to become better organized but if failed to do so. Irene had no bearing on this.


--------------------
The only way of finding the limits of the possible is by going beyond them into the impossible. ~Arthur C Clarke

It is better to have people think you a fool, than to open your mouth and remove all doubt. ~Mark Twain

A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice. ~Bill Cosby

Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can't lose. ~Bill Gates
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