Login to AccuWeather.com Premium Login to AccuWeather.com Professional Login to AccuWeather.com RadarPlus AccuWeather.com

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> "Storm of the Century" Blizzard of 1993, AKA Superstorm - History, Prediction, Etc.
Marty Moose
post Jan 10 2008, 11:26 PM
Post #1




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 150
Joined: 4-January 08
Member No.: 11,937





The biggest weather event that I ever lived through was the famous March, 1993 "Superstorm."

I was a senior in high school and a member of the wrestling team. The Northeast PA Regional tournament was taking place that weekend in Williamsport, PA, which was about an hour-and-a-half from my hometown of Wyalusing.

The tournament began on Friday night, and the weather was relatively quiet. I can remember returning to the hotel room, flipping on the Weather Channel, and being amazed at blizzard warnings that were calling for FEET of snow.

The snow arrived when we were on our way from the hotel to the high school the next day; an innocuos-looking snowfall that had my teammates and I wondering what all the fuss in the forecast was about. However, by midday, things had gotten serious. I attempted to take a quick stroll out to the parking lot during a break between rounds, but quickly came back inside after being assaulted by heavy, wind-driven snow.

The tournament was compressed to finish ahead of time that day, so that everyone could get an early start in their attempts to battle the elements and return home or to their hotels. My dad would not allow me to return to the hotel in which my team was staying. Instead, he took me to his hotel after we had dug our way out of the parking lot and fought our way down the mountain on which the high school was located.

We spent the next three days holed up in the hotel room, watching all of the news stories about the historical storm. I remember waking up that first night, looking out the window, and seeing an entire flagpole whip from side to side in the fierce wind.

Each morning, my dad would walk about a half-mile to a nearby convenience store that had somehow managed to stay open to pick up some food for the day. Pickings were slim: I remember eating mainly donuts and potato chips, with maybe a sandwich or two thrown in.

Finally, Dad felt we could attempt to make the trek home. The hour-and-a-half journey was dreamlike...I had never seen snow as deep or drifts so high in my life. For most of the trip, we were the only car on the road.

Amazingly, we did not have to make any detours until we were within a few miles of our house. We came to one point that was impassible --- dozers that had been brought in to plow the snow had gotten stuck in drifts that were about 15' high!

Finally, we came to the last hill leading to our house and found that it hadn't been touched. We parked at a neighbor's house at the foot of the hill, and waded through waist and chest-deep snow to get home.

I was never as happy to see my mom, my dog, and my home as I was at that moment.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
lovesnow
post Jan 14 2008, 07:50 PM
Post #2




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 88
Joined: 14-January 08
From: Glen Allen VA (Southern - Mid-Atlantic - I-95 corridor)
Member No.: 12,503





I loved that storm. Classic!!! I was in NOVA, and had to go to work the next day (waitress). It snowed there about 6 inches, then we got about an inch of sleet/ice, and then more snow. So digging out was a mess, once you got past the first 6 inches. Boss came to dig me out (was it really that important?), then I had to go downtown to DC for an interview. UGH.

Live in Richmond now, and the last big snow we got was a foot in 2000. I am SERIOUSLY snow starved!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mikeyj1220
post Jan 20 2008, 01:34 AM
Post #3




Rank: F5 Superstorm
***

Group: Founding Member
Posts: 505
Joined: 12-December 07
From: Greensburg, Pa (30mi East of Pittsburgh) Laurel Highlands
Member No.: 11,728





NOAA SUPERSTORM 93 INFO (Snow totals, wind gusts, etc...)

http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/techrpt...9301/tr9301.pdf



This post has been edited by mikeyj1220: Jan 20 2008, 01:42 AM


--------------------
Not snow starved this winter of 09/10: Approx.. 85-90 inches

Feb 2010 beat our snow record in one month with approx. 45-50 inches
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mikeyj1220
post Jan 21 2008, 03:00 AM
Post #4




Rank: F5 Superstorm
***

Group: Founding Member
Posts: 505
Joined: 12-December 07
From: Greensburg, Pa (30mi East of Pittsburgh) Laurel Highlands
Member No.: 11,728





Here is a sight which has the forecasting models (Starts on page 6) in black and white:

http://www.cimms.ou.edu/~schultz/pubs/dickinsonetal97.PDF

TWC on Super Storm 93 and animated track (Look at the old TWC HAHA):

http://berkswintercast.tripod.com/id62.html

The second video down has great footage of the storm and other good vids (GREAT)!!!

http://www.samohonka.deesirable-pleasure.i...torm-of-'93

TWC Local Forecast During Super Storm 93 (Pittsburgh, Pa):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WECb-QgjfPk

TWC Forecasting Super Storm (3:21 min) good video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44cHhoU0mwc...feature=related

Did you know that the Super Storm of 93 was a tie for 1st place for most memorable weather event?:

http://www.farmersalmanac.com/weather/a/to..._weather_events

Super Storm 93 Images:
http://images.google.com/images?q=supersto...sa=N&tab=wi

Will add more later!!!! Or add your stuff!!!

This post has been edited by mikeyj1220: Jan 21 2008, 03:24 AM


--------------------
Not snow starved this winter of 09/10: Approx.. 85-90 inches

Feb 2010 beat our snow record in one month with approx. 45-50 inches
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mikeyj1220
post Jan 21 2008, 03:24 AM
Post #5




Rank: F5 Superstorm
***

Group: Founding Member
Posts: 505
Joined: 12-December 07
From: Greensburg, Pa (30mi East of Pittsburgh) Laurel Highlands
Member No.: 11,728





TWC Local Forecast Super Storm 93 (Elmira, Ny):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81QHeVdm0zM

Another Radar of Super Storm 1993:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWmlG-Egaq8

Telling That The NMC Model Forecasted The Super Storm of 93 (Second Link Has Models From The SUPERSTORM:

http://ams.allenpress.com/perlserv/?SESSID...OT%3E2.0.CO%3B2

http://ams.allenpress.com/archive/1520-047...77-76-2-201.pdf

NCDC (NOAA) DATA FROM STORM (Very Interesting Uses Adobe):

http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/techrpt...9301/tr9301.pdf

http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/techrpt...9303/tr9303.pdf

This post has been edited by mikeyj1220: Jan 21 2008, 04:28 AM


--------------------
Not snow starved this winter of 09/10: Approx.. 85-90 inches

Feb 2010 beat our snow record in one month with approx. 45-50 inches
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
WeatherMatrix
post Jan 21 2008, 08:14 AM
Post #6




Admin
***

Group: Administrator
Posts: 7,121
Joined: 6-March 05
From: State College, PA
Member No.: 2





What a great storm. Thanks for the links, here's a page I made years ago containing some photos, TWC screen caps, stats and AccuWeather graphics.



--------------------
-- Jesse Ferrell, FORUM ADMIN & MODERATOR

-- AccuWeather.com Meteorologist / Social Media Coordinator

-- My Blog | My Facebook Page




HELPFUL LINKS: MODEL FAQ / WEATHER QUESTIONS | FORUM FAQ / QUESTIONS
STAY ON TOPIC! TALK ABOUT PAST STORMS | TALK ABOUT NON-WEATHER STUFF
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
NCwthrgirl
post Jan 29 2008, 10:32 PM
Post #7




Rank: Whirlwind
*

Group: Member
Posts: 13
Joined: 25-January 08
From: Raleigh, NC
Member No.: 13,118





I lived in Savannah, GA at the time and we had flurries!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mikeyj1220
post Feb 1 2008, 03:40 AM
Post #8




Rank: F5 Superstorm
***

Group: Founding Member
Posts: 505
Joined: 12-December 07
From: Greensburg, Pa (30mi East of Pittsburgh) Laurel Highlands
Member No.: 11,728





Here is a good article! I just saw that we had 36 inches and not 30 like I thought! It says in the article that Latrobe, PA had 36 inches with 6-10 foot drifts!

http://www.jamesspann.com/wordpress/?p=1201


--------------------
Not snow starved this winter of 09/10: Approx.. 85-90 inches

Feb 2010 beat our snow record in one month with approx. 45-50 inches
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
snowstorm madman
post Feb 6 2008, 10:32 PM
Post #9




Rank: F5 Superstorm
***

Group: Member
Posts: 2,307
Joined: 24-January 08
From: Southern Indiana
Member No.: 12,966





QUOTE(mikeyj1220 @ Jan 20 2008, 01:34 AM) *
NOAA SUPERSTORM 93 INFO (Snow totals, wind gusts, etc...)

http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/techrpt...9301/tr9301.pdf


my only storm so far and it left me begging for more.


--------------------
HEAVY SNOW ADVOCATE / SNOW STORM LOBBYIST
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
missmarisa
post Feb 14 2008, 11:42 AM
Post #10




Rank: F5 Superstorm
***

Group: SuperModerator
Posts: 7,804
Joined: 3-December 07
From: Far NW NJ
Member No.: 11,489





That was an awesome storm.

I was travelling with the King's College Debate Team. We had arrived in Virginia for a Debate Tournament involving several schools. I can't remember, but I think it was hosted by William and Mary.

When the blizzard hit, everyone was snowed in at our hotel, so we held the debates in our hotel rooms, and simply went from room to room. I remember the hotel was packed, and there were people even sleeping in the lobby because the rooms were sold out.

Many major highways were closed, and it was difficult getting home, even after the storm has ended. It was a great time, though!


--------------------





Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Nessie
post Mar 5 2008, 11:42 AM
Post #11




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 222
Joined: 14-January 08
From: Wilkes-Barre
Member No.: 12,514





QUOTE(snowyweatherman @ Mar 5 2008, 11:40 AM) *
The march storm of 1993 was misforcasted 2 days before the event it was to be flurries then everything came together.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storm_of_the_...93)#Forecasting


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mikeyj1220
post Mar 5 2008, 11:43 AM
Post #12




Rank: F5 Superstorm
***

Group: Founding Member
Posts: 505
Joined: 12-December 07
From: Greensburg, Pa (30mi East of Pittsburgh) Laurel Highlands
Member No.: 11,728





QUOTE(snowyweatherman @ Mar 5 2008, 11:40 AM) *
The march storm of 1993 was misforcasted 2 days before the event it was to be flurries then everything came together. WE are talking about Fri nite into saturday, it is only Wednesday. Let's wait and see what happens



Ive read a couple places that it was forecasted 5 days ahead, I might be wrong though? Ill try to find it!


--------------------
Not snow starved this winter of 09/10: Approx.. 85-90 inches

Feb 2010 beat our snow record in one month with approx. 45-50 inches
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mikeyj1220
post Mar 5 2008, 11:44 AM
Post #13




Rank: F5 Superstorm
***

Group: Founding Member
Posts: 505
Joined: 12-December 07
From: Greensburg, Pa (30mi East of Pittsburgh) Laurel Highlands
Member No.: 11,728





Forecasting
The 1993 Storm of the Century marked a milestone in U.S. weather forecasting. By March 8 (and by some accounts even earlier), several operational numerical weather prediction models and medium-range forecasters at the US National Weather Service recognized the threat of a significant snowstorm. By the 12th, many had reviewed the data and had become convinced that a serious threat loomed overhead. This marked the first time that National Weather Service meteorologists were able to predict so precisely the severity of an oncoming storm five days in advance


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storm_of_the_Century_(1993)


--------------------
Not snow starved this winter of 09/10: Approx.. 85-90 inches

Feb 2010 beat our snow record in one month with approx. 45-50 inches
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ThunderSnow
post Mar 5 2008, 02:25 PM
Post #14




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 87
Joined: 8-January 08
From: Houlton, ME
Member No.: 12,108







--------------------
2013 Weather Summary for Houlton, ME Updated April 10, 2013
Max. Temp: 56F Jan. 31
Min. Temp: -11F Feb. 8
Precip: 7.21"
Highest Wind Gust: 47 mph Jan. 31
2012-2013 Snow: 95.5" (2011-2012 Winter: 71.5")
2012-2013 Max. Snow in a Storm: 18" Mar. 19-20
Other Notable (6"+) Snowstorms of the 2012-2013 Season:
Dec. 18-19- 8" | Dec. 27-28- 16.5" | Feb. 9- 8" | Feb. 16-18- 9" | Feb. 28-Mar. 1- 8"
Season Snowfall Average (06-07 winter - 11-12 winter): 109" (Max: 159.5" 07-08; Min: 71.5" 11-12)
Go Yankees!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ScrantonSnowman
post Mar 5 2008, 10:26 PM
Post #15




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 326
Joined: 20-February 08
Member No.: 13,831





QUOTE(snogoose @ Mar 5 2008, 10:22 PM) *
THERE IS NO REASON TO EVEN SPECULATE ABOUT THIS UP COMMING STORM... MODELS WILL NOT HAVE A HANDLE ON THIS THING UNTIL EARLY FRI MORN.. GUARNTEED.... MARCH 93 RING A BELL..... STORMS WITH THIS ENERGY POTENTIAL DONT TYPICALLY HANDLE WELL BY THE MODELS .. HENCE ALL THE WAFFLINNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNG..... CAN ANYONE FIND THE FORECAST FOR THE MID ATLANTIC 2- 3 DAYS BEFORE MARCH SUPERTORM???? IF YOU CAN FIND THAT INFORMATION YOUR ANSWER TO QUESTIONS WILL COINCIDE....


In 1993: By March 8 (and by some accounts even earlier), several operational numerical weather prediction models and medium-range forecasters at the US National Weather Service recognized the threat of a significant snowstorm on March 13-14. This was the first time that National Weather Service employees were able to so precisely predict the severity of an oncoming storm five days in advance, and issue blizzard warnings two days in advance. Because of newer computer and forecasting technology, forecasters were confident enough to allow several northeastern U.S. States to declare a State of Emergency before the snow even started to fall.

They knew the significance of the storm pretty early.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ScrantonSnowman
post Mar 9 2008, 02:59 AM
Post #16




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 326
Joined: 20-February 08
Member No.: 13,831





Does anyone have a time machine so we can go back and relive the 93 blizzard because I don't think we'll ever experience a storm like that again. I was also only 4 years old, I want to experience the meteorology of a storm like that. Today's storms are hardly worth paying attention.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
apeaslee
post Apr 20 2008, 04:33 AM
Post #17




Rank: F5 Superstorm
***

Group: Member
Posts: 1,487
Joined: 15-March 08
From: pittsfield,ma.
Member No.: 14,376





when this superstorm of march 1993 hit the area,it hit areas best from texas into the deep south into the mid-atlantic.then the superstorm emerges off of the va coast and explodes with incredible strength as if as though it was the incredible hulk.but what also takes place is,while the superstorm explodes with incredible strength off of the mid-atlantic coast.the superstorm starts moving faster in its forward speed from the deep south to just off of the va coast.so one minute the superstorm was moving along slowly from texas to ga.then from ga to the va coast,the superstorm picks up speed in forward movement to 25-30mph,and then 35mph.so from just off of the va coast to cape cod,the superstorm picks up incredible speed up to 70mph in her forward movement while exploding with incredible strength an intensity.while she was cruising along with incredible speed like this,it really cut down on my accumulations and it never was a superstorm of 93 for my area,because i got missed by it from it moving along at such highspeeds in her forward movement.i only got a measily 2ft of snow from that snowstorm,it was only a big snowstorm around here,it wasnt a major snowstorm or a superstorm.so had this superstorm not of picked up incredible speeds in her forward movement,it was predicted that my area was gonna get dumped on with 5ft of snow or higher,it was supposed to be a mammoth snowstorm.i was all happy and excited,i couldnt hardly wait to get nailed by this incredible huge superstorm,but then i heard she was picking up speed going faster and faster,and so i knew then that my area wasnt going to get as much as first predicted.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
weatherbud
post May 2 2008, 04:29 AM
Post #18




Rank: Tornado
**

Group: Member
Posts: 116
Joined: 1-April 08
Member No.: 14,556





This is a very nice post. The links are awesome! Thanks for that... I could include this to the links i am collecting now for these historical storms... smile.gif


--------------------
Weather Blogs Hurricane Ike
---------------------------------------------------------------------
"Snowflakes are kisses from heaven..."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
denandtina
post May 2 2008, 08:10 AM
Post #19




Rank: F5 Superstorm
***

Group: Member
Posts: 1,039
Joined: 19-January 08
From: Loysville, Perry Co. Pa.
Member No.: 12,744





This was an amazing storm. I was 23 years old at the time and a young newly-wed. We had only just bought our house 2 years prior. My wife worked within walking distance and had walked to work that day. Early afternoon when the b lizzard really cranked up, her boss closed the office early. My two young stepchildren and I walked down to bring her home. Very Norman Rockwell! The next morning, the drifts were almost to the top of the french doors leading onto out deck, which was already 2 feet off of the ground. The drifts were almost 8 feet deep in places around our property. I don't recall the exact amount of snow we received, but I think we were around 30" west of Harrisburg.

Here is what I found out for Pa. on the NWS website:



DOC >NOAA >NESDIS >NCDC Search Field:



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Event Record Details

Event: Blizzard
Begin Date: 13 Mar 1993, 1200 EST
Begin Location: Not Known
End Date: 14 Mar 1993, 0700EST EST
End Location: Not Known
Magnitude: 0
Fatalities: 2
Injuries: 0
Property Damage: $ 5.0M
Crop Damage: $ 0.0
State: Pennsylvania
Map of Counties
Forecast
Zones affected: Adams, Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Bedford, Berks, Blair, Bradford, Bucks, Butler, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Chester, Clarion, Clearfield, Columbia, Crawford, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Elk, Fayette, Forest, Franklin, Fulton, Greene, Huntingdon, Indiana, Jefferson, Juniata, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lawrence, Lebanon, Lehigh, Luzerne, Mckean, Mercer, Mifflin, Monroe, Montgomery, Montour, Northampton, Northern Centre, Northern Clinton, Northern Erie, Northern Lycoming, Northern Wayne, Northumberland, Perry, Philadelphia, Pike, Potter, Schuylkill, Snyder, Somerset, Southern Centre, Southern Clinton, Southern Erie, Southern Lycoming, Southern Wayne, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Union, Venango, Warren, Washington, Westmoreland, Wyoming, York


Description:
One of the biggest snowstorms this century struck western and central Pennsylvania. Arctic air from Canada, combined with moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean to fuel a powerful storm which moved northward along the Atlantic Coast. In western and central Pennsylvania blizzard conditions were met for much of the late afternoon and evening hours of the 13th. Wind gusts to 50 mph, visibilities near zero and snowfall rates of 2 to 3 inches an hour were common. Thunder was also reported in some locations. Total snowfall ranged from 10 to 36 inches, with drifts of 6 to 10 feet. At the Pittsburgh International Airport, the storm dropped 24.3 inches of snow, of which, 23.6 fell in one calendar day. This broke the old calendar day record of 22.0 inches which fell on December 7, 1890. Elsewhere across the State, heavy snow reports were as follows: 36 inches at Latrobe, 27 inches at State College, 24 inches at Dubois, 18 inches at Bradford, 16 inches at Franklin, and 14 inches at Erie. At approximately 1500 EST on Saturday the 13th, Governor Casey declared a state of emergency. All airports across the State, including Pittsburgh International, were closed. All highways, including Interstate 80 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike were also closed. The National Guard was called upon to help rescue stranded travelers and clear roads. The state of emergency remained in effect through the following week. The Pittsburgh International Airport began limited operations on Sunday the 14th. Area interstate highways began opening late Sunday, and by Monday, all were opened. Revenues lost due to the storm were in the tens of millions. However, damage to property across western Pennsylvania was minimal when compared to actual storm magnitude. In Venango County, a warehouse collapsed from heavy snow. In Potter County, a commercial building collapsed, and two homes sustained roof damage from wind. In Mercer County a 50-foot awning collapsed in Greenville. Exposure. (M77O) (M63O)




--------------------
Every snowstorm can't be a '93 or '96

"I reject your reality and substitute my own."-quote by Adam Savage of Mythbusters.

This post courtesy of Dennis; Posting With Common Sense And Zen-Like Calmness.


Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Removed_Member_CapeCodWeather08_*
post Oct 31 2008, 05:16 PM
Post #20







Guests








Those of us on Cape Cod, MA didn't receive much from this monster storm and historic storm. Someday there will be a storm thats worse then this one, just not any time soon. I would like to relive in a storm like this, but we got 6" then it turned to rain, thats what my father said so he doesn't know much from this storm. I was 3 years old. The two major snowstorms I remember is the President's Day Snowstorm of 2003 and the Great North American Blizzard of 2005, when I received 35" of snow, it was the coldest I could remember from such a storm here on the coast. Great links that I'm saving to my favorites on this Storm of the Century. Sometime this century there will be a storm similar to this or worse.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st November 2014 - 02:04 PM