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> FANTASY MAPS... YOUR DREAM STORM, Draw up your dream storm for your area (maps)
WMDWXNUT
post Dec 18 2011, 11:06 AM
Post #121




Rank: Tornado
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Group: Member
Posts: 415
Joined: 17-December 09
From: Keedysville, MD
Member No.: 20,290





QUOTE(NYCSuburbs @ Dec 18 2011, 09:30 AM) *
Since your locations says Keedysville, MD, here's your fantasy storm:

**Correction, I made a slight typo accidentally adding writing "WMDWXNUTS" instead of "WMDWXNUT".

[attachment=147984:NewFantasy1.png]

[attachment=147985:NewFantasy2.png]

The easiest way to make these maps is to use paint. I prefer to use Powerpoint, as although it's harder to use and takes more time it can lead to creative results if you know how to use it right.


Ahhhh, she's a bute!! Thanks. One day we will see this....or maybe we have??? March 93, what a storm for W MD. If I remember correctly that was a sub 970mb at the mouth of the Chesapeake.



--------------------
10 mi south of Hagerstown, md

Winter 2013-2014

12/8 7.2"
12/10 5.25"
1/2 3.25"
1/21 7.5"
2/3 4"
2/9 1"
2/13 14.5"
2/15 .5"
2/18 1"
3/3 4.5"
3/17 4.75
3/25 1.5"

Total: 55"

Winter 2012-2013

Total: 20.25"
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sw03181
post Dec 18 2011, 07:21 PM
Post #122




Rank: F5 Superstorm
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From: South Windsor, CT
Member No.: 16,373





2100-2101 Season Snowfall predictions (UNOFFICIAL):


NYC and all points South: 200"
BDR: 225"
BDL: 275"
BOS: 250"
ALB: 320"

All cities North of I90: 500"

All Cities West of Cleveland will see average snow.

First Snowfall 3" or more: September 23
Last Snowfall 3" or more: May 2nd

The rain/snow line shall remain no farther North than a line from Nashville to Charlotte:

A large ocean-effect storm will produce widespread areas of 4-5 foot snow accumulations from Cape Hatteras to Portsmouth, NH

Orlando will meet warning criteria snowfall for the first time ever.

Flakes will mix in at times as far South as Cuba.

A surprise Easter blizzard will cause global temperatures to fall to their lowest in over 300 years.

And finally...

The model verification will always occur at least 288 hours out. laugh.gif



--------------------
Rob
2012-2013 Total Snowfall: 85.5"

2013-2014 Winter Wx predictions (Nov. 1 -- Mar. 31):
Total Snowfall (Nov. 1 -- Mar. 31): 47"
Actual: 38.5"


11/12: T
11/23: T (LES)
12/7: T
12/9: T
12/10: 3.0"
12/14: 6.0"
12/17: 4.0"
12/24: T (just a few flakes)
12/26: 0.5"
1/1-1/3: 7.5"
1/10: 1.0"
1/19: T
1/21-1/22: 4" (FAIL)
1/29 "HECS": T
2/3: 3"
2/5: 9.5"
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NYCSuburbs
post Dec 23 2011, 04:24 PM
Post #123




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Now that I found my file for the fantasy storms I drew, I think I'm going to be here more often until the pattern changes laugh.gif

I have plenty of new maps to post over the next few days, including a monster blizzard that dumps a season's worth of snow in the Mid Atlantic.

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NYCSuburbs
post Dec 23 2011, 07:16 PM
Post #124




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Out of boredom waiting for the pattern to eventually change, I present NYCSuburbs Fantasy Storm Upgraded Version 2.0: A triple phase takes place, and a storm rapidly intensifies while moving up the coast, becoming a large 957 mb low stalling briefly off the coast of New Jersey before weakening and moving northeast. Behind this storm the cold air mass intensifies, with sub-zero lows in NYC.

This is all 2" QPF of plain high ratio snow falling in NYC in a 6-hour time frame:

Attached Image


Attached Image


My imaginary total QPF has 4" QPF in NYC which translates to 50" with the high ratios involved and the storm stalling for a while. DC sees 25", Philly has 45", and Boston has 40".

Attached Image


And to spread the wealth, I also moved the storm around so that almost each region gets to see its own fantasy blizzard:

Attached Image
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Cabinetsales
post Dec 30 2011, 03:57 AM
Post #125




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From: Midlothian, VA
Member No.: 12,093





No map yet but how about A winter storm that follows the track of Hurricane Gaston (a TD when it reached Richmond)

Gaston
QUOTE
As the storm tracked northward through Virginia as a tropical depression, it produced torrential rainfall, peaking at 12.60 in (320 mm) in Richmond.[23] The storm strengthened over Virginia, as it pivoted from a northerly track to a northeasterly track nearly over the Richmond area, which led to the afternoon of exceptional rainfall, with the epicenter over Richmond


Except...with 10:1 ratios we'd end up with 126 inches of snow in downtown Richmond....in Chesterfield where I live the rain totals were only around 6" so only 60" of snow wink.gif



--------------------
Christian, Husband, Father, Frustrated I-95 Corridor snow lover, 67-72 chevy trucks fan, and independent cabinet designer/sales
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chris222
post Feb 27 2012, 03:08 PM
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First Map:
light blue: 10"+
dark blue: 20"+
red: 30"+
yellow: 40"+
green: 50"+

Third Map:
gray: 1"+
white: 3"+
pink: 6"+
purple: 12"+



Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image
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Niyologist
post Feb 27 2012, 03:54 PM
Post #127




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From: Mount Vernon, NY
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Here's a nice Fantasy Storm I worked on for a good while.

Attached Image


--------------------
CURRENT IEM/OEM SET: VSonic GR06 (MSRP $59.99), MEElec M-DUO (MSRP $79.99), Beyerdynamic DTX-910 (MSRP $79.99), Ultrasone HFI-450 (MSRP $119.99), JVC HA-FXT90 (MSRP $135.00)

SOURCE: Cowon J3 8GB DAP (WHT)+Fiio E11 Headphone Amplifier w/C3 32GB MicroSD Card Class 6

To learn more about Sound Frequency:
http://www.independentrecording.net/irn/re...ain_display.htm

If you need help with choosing the right IEMs (In Ear Monitors)
http://www.head-fi.org/forum/thread/478568...-ie-added-05-20


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snowrawrsnow
post Feb 28 2012, 12:36 AM
Post #128




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From: New Castle, PA
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Wish I had seen this thread before wink.gif



Bet you can't guess where i'm from. laugh.gif


--------------------
~Snowy♥
QUOTE
There's a blaze of light in every word
It doesn't matter which you heard
The holy or the broken Hallelujah
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Sagebrusher
post Mar 2 2012, 01:55 AM
Post #129




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From: Iowa City IA
Member No.: 2,132





QUOTE(snowrawrsnow @ Feb 28 2012, 01:36 AM) *
Wish I had seen this thread before wink.gif



Bet you can't guess where i'm from. laugh.gif


That looks like a hurricane track in midwinter!

Perhaps this would happen if we had a nearby supernova in the middle of the northern hemisphere winter. If one was as close as our nearest neighboring star, Promixa Centauri, the extra energy input would be equivalent to having another sun, for a few weeks.

If the supernova was positioned near the plane of the ecliptic (like our sun) then in the winter it would help warm the Gulf of Mexico to summer-like temps, while not warming the north pole very much. This would lead to an extreme temperature gradient.

This post has been edited by Sagebrusher: Mar 2 2012, 01:55 AM
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NYCSuburbs
post Mar 6 2012, 11:13 PM
Post #130




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This was the March 2nd storm in the Great Lakes (same one that had the SE severe weather outbreak):

Attached Image


Using the SPC Mesoscale Analysis data for that day, move the storm way east, keep it the way it is, and you get the following image.

There would be three positives if this had happened:

1. I-95 would've finally gotten snow and I wouldn't be looking at this thread thinking of millions of possible storms that would actually produce snow here
2. The severe weather would not have affected the Southeast
3. The fish would get the severe weather outbreak

Attached Image
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NYCSuburbs
post Jul 17 2012, 11:10 PM
Post #131




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Got a bit bored, and anyways there's barely 5 months left...

I don't know even if parts of it are realistic or not, I just came up with the wildest yet realistic looking nor'easter I could... minimum pressure is around 952 mb.

Attached Image
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NYCSuburbs
post Nov 26 2012, 10:27 PM
Post #132




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After Sandy, I had to rethink my definition of a "dream storm". More coming soon (and plenty of it, as I seek to keep myself occupied in the no-snow zone otherwise known as Albany).
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chris222
post Feb 3 2013, 11:28 AM
Post #133




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"On January 3, 1989, a strong extratropical cyclone moved off the coast of North Carolina, and pulled a large mass of Arctic air over the ocean behind it. As the cyclone crossed the warm waters of the Gulf Stream, where water temperatures were over 70 degrees, the storm "bombed". It's central pressure fell 66 mb in 18 hours to an astounding 936 mb--a pressure typical of a Category 3 or 4 hurricane! Post-analysis of the data suggested that the pressure fell even further, to 928 mb. This was the lowest pressure ever observed in an Atlantic extratropical cyclone south of 40 degrees latitude in the 20th century. But since the storm never affected land, few people outside of the research community have ever heard of it, and it doesn't even get a ranking on the NESIS scale."

"As we crashed through the front, the surface winds picked up to 100 mph, and some hard, jolting bumps of turbulence rocked the airplane. This was like flying through a Category 2 hurricane! An awesome parade of 35-foot high waves whipped into a green-white froth rolled beneath us."

"They encountered intense lightning and moderate turbulence in some of the rain bands. The morning satellite imagery confirmed that we were dealing with a true monster--none of us could ever remember seeing such huge storm over the Atlantic."


"The January 4, 1989 flight into the IOP 4 storm marked the only flight I'd ever been on where we performed a U-turn to escape severe turbulence. Despite not directly measuring the most interesting part of the storm, we were able to capture the best data set ever of an extratropical cyclone tapping the warm waters of the Gulf Stream to become a hybrid warm-core system."










This storm over land.
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Sagebrusher
post Feb 4 2013, 02:41 AM
Post #134




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From: Iowa City IA
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QUOTE(chris222 @ Feb 3 2013, 12:28 PM) *
"On January 3, 1989, a strong extratropical cyclone moved off the coast of North Carolina, and pulled a large mass of Arctic air over the ocean behind it. As the cyclone crossed the warm waters of the Gulf Stream, where water temperatures were over 70 degrees, the storm "bombed". It's central pressure fell 66 mb in 18 hours to an astounding 936 mb--a pressure typical of a Category 3 or 4 hurricane! Post-analysis of the data suggested that the pressure fell even further, to 928 mb. This was the lowest pressure ever observed in an Atlantic extratropical cyclone south of 40 degrees latitude in the 20th century. But since the storm never affected land, few people outside of the research community have ever heard of it, and it doesn't even get a ranking on the NESIS scale."

"As we crashed through the front, the surface winds picked up to 100 mph, and some hard, jolting bumps of turbulence rocked the airplane. This was like flying through a Category 2 hurricane! An awesome parade of 35-foot high waves whipped into a green-white froth rolled beneath us."

"They encountered intense lightning and moderate turbulence in some of the rain bands. The morning satellite imagery confirmed that we were dealing with a true monster--none of us could ever remember seeing such huge storm over the Atlantic."
"The January 4, 1989 flight into the IOP 4 storm marked the only flight I'd ever been on where we performed a U-turn to escape severe turbulence. Despite not directly measuring the most interesting part of the storm, we were able to capture the best data set ever of an extratropical cyclone tapping the warm waters of the Gulf Stream to become a hybrid warm-core system."





This storm over land.


Wow! Good thing it didn't hit land. Might have been worse than Sandy!
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Louieloy102
post Feb 12 2013, 12:44 AM
Post #135




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Really...just this.
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