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Beck
post Jul 14 2010, 06:43 PM
Post #1061




Rank: F5 Superstorm
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From: Temecula, California
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On this day in...

1886: LA recorded its greatest 24-hour rainfall amount for July at 0.24 inch.

1967: Heavy thunderstorms struck the high desert for the second day in a row. Major highways were flooded and washed out west of Victorville.


--------------------
Temecula Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 0.88" (-1.00")
Normal to-date precipitation: 1.88"
Season began July 1st, 2014.

My Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 1.22"

Temecula Weather Pages
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Beck
post Jul 15 2010, 09:26 PM
Post #1062




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On this day in...

1972: It was 94° in Big Bear Lake, the highest temperature on record. This also occurred on this date in 1998 and on
7.18.2005.

1998: It was 94° in Big Bear Lake, the highest temperature on record. This also occurred on this date in 1972 and on
7.18.2005.


--------------------
Temecula Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 0.88" (-1.00")
Normal to-date precipitation: 1.88"
Season began July 1st, 2014.

My Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 1.22"

Temecula Weather Pages
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Beck
post Jul 16 2010, 11:07 PM
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On this day in...

1884: The low temperature was 54° in San Diego, the lowest on record for July.

1923: It was 41° in Escondido, the lowest temperature on record for July.

1954: A severe thunderstorm struck the Daggett area east of Barstow. In addition to the heavy rains and flooding, this storm produced damaging winds. These “gales” knocked down several power poles and were “hurled across the highway”. A mobile home was overturned and “ripped to pieces”.

1998: It was 127° in Death Valley.


--------------------
Temecula Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 0.88" (-1.00")
Normal to-date precipitation: 1.88"
Season began July 1st, 2014.

My Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 1.22"

Temecula Weather Pages
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Beck
post Jul 18 2010, 12:24 AM
Post #1064




Rank: F5 Superstorm
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Posts: 29,795
Joined: 2-December 09
From: Temecula, California
Member No.: 19,931





On this day in...

1954: A northward moving hurricane made landfall in central Baja California with the remnants moving into Arizona. Rainfall of up to two inches occurred in the mountains and deserts starting on this day and ending on 7.19. This occurred during the El Niño of 1953-54.

1960: It was 101° at Idyllwild, the highest temperature on record. This also occurred on 7.9.2002.

1970: The low temperature was 70° in Idyllwild, the highest low temperature on record.

1987: A rare and unseasonable cold-season storm hit San Diego County. 0.03 inch of rain fell at San Diego (normal July monthly rainfall is 0.01 inch). In Vista 0.21 inch fell, 0.10 inch in Fallbrook, 0.08 inch at Montgomery Field, 0.07 inch in Coronado, and 0.06 inch in Del Mar.

2005: Temperatures in the lower desert cities reached or exceeded 120°.


--------------------
Temecula Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 0.88" (-1.00")
Normal to-date precipitation: 1.88"
Season began July 1st, 2014.

My Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 1.22"

Temecula Weather Pages
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hurricanff
post Jul 18 2010, 10:08 AM
Post #1065




Rank: Whirlwind
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Posts: 22
Joined: 27-January 05
From: Bellmore,NY(Southshore of Nassau County)
Member No.: 680





July 18,2007..3-5" of rain fall across Long Island in a short period of time.EF1 Tornado touches down in Islip Terrace


Photos I took at work in Plainview














PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
SPOTTER REPORTS
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE UPTON NY
1054 PM EDT WED JUL 18 2007

...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE METEOROLOGISTS CONFIRM EF1 TORNADO
TOUCHDOWN IN ISLIP TERRACE IN SUFFOLK COUNTY...

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE METEOROLOGISTS INVESTIGATING STORM DAMAGE
IN THE ISLIP TERRACE AREA WITH ISLIP EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS
HAVE CONFIRMED THAT TORNADIC DAMAGE HAS OCCURRED IN THE AREA.

THE TORNADO PATH WAS DISCONTINUOUS AND STARTED IN THE TOWN OF ISLIP
TERRACE SOMETIME BETWEEN 9:20 AM AND 9:30 AM NEAR THE INTERSECTION
OF IRISH LANE AND THE NORTH SERVICE ROAD OF SUNRISE HIGHWAY. IT THEN
CONTINUED ABOUT TWO-THIRDS OF A MILE TO THE EASTNORTHEAST ACROSS
CARLETON AVENUE...ACROSS ROSLYN AND NASSAU STREETS AND ENDED AT
NASSAU AND KUNIGUNDA PLACE. THE PATH WAS NARROW AT FIRST...ONLY
AROUND 50 YARDS ACROSS NEAR THE INTERSECTION OF IRISH LANE AND THE
NORTH SERVICE ROAD OF SUNRISE HIGHWAY BUT FANNED OUT TO 150 YARDS
TOWARD THE END.

MOST OF THE DAMAGE WAS TO HARDWOOD TREES. TWISTED OFF BRANCHES WERE
EVIDENT THROUGHOUT THE DAMAGE PATH. SOME TREES WERE SNAPPED OFF
HALFWAY UP...INCLUDING SOME HEALTHY...FORTY-PLUS FOOT PINES.

IN ADDITION...THE MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING AT IRISH LANE AND SUNRISE
HIGHWAY SUSTAINED STRUCTURAL DAMAGE...WITH SIGNIFICANT LOSS OF ITS
ROOF COVERING AND THE HVAC UNIT BLOWN OFF ITS ROOF. OTHER HOMES
ALONG THE DAMAGE PATH ALSO SUSTAINED SOME MINOR DAMAGE MOSTLY TO
SIDING AND SOME DIRECTLY FROM TREES.

BASED ON THE DAMAGE THIS TORNADO IS CLASSIFIED AS AN EF-1 TORNADO
WITH ESTIMATED WIND SPEEDS OF 85 TO 100 MPH.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAD ISSUED A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM
WARNING FOR THIS STORM AT 849 AM THAT WAS UPGRADED TO A TORNADO
WARNING AT 919 AM. THE TORNADO OCCURRED IN THE ISLIP TERRACE AREA
AROUND THE TIME THE TORNADO WARNING WAS ISSUED.



$$

WYLLIE/GOODMAN

$$

********************STORM TOTAL RAINFALL********************

LOCATION STORM TOTAL TIME/DATE COMMENTS
RAINFALL OF
(INCHES) MEASUREMENT


NEW YORK

...NASSAU COUNTY...
GARDEN CITY 5.18 200 PM 7/18 NASSAU COMM COLLEGE
GARDEN CITY 3.44 200 PM 7/18 MESONET
CARLE PLACE 3.44 200 PM 7/18 SPOTTER
FARMINGDALE 3.02 200 PM 7/18
MUTTONTOWN 2.84 300 PM 7/18 SPOTTER

...NEW YORK COUNTY...
NYC/CENTRAL PARK 1.59 200 PM 7/18

...QUEENS COUNTY...
FRESH MEADOWS 3.35 200 PM 7/18 MESONET
NYC/LA GUARDIA 2.67 200 PM 7/18
NYC/JFK ARPT 0.75 200 PM 7/18

...SUFFOLK COUNTY...
HOLTSVILLE 4.20 1200 PM 7/18 SPOTTER
EAST QUOGUE 4.02 200 PM 7/18 MESONET
UPTON 3.92 200 PM 7/18 NWS FORECAST OFFICE
SHIRLEY 3.75 200 PM 7/18
ISLIP 3.34 200 PM 7/18
NORTH BABYLON 3.25 343 PM 7/18 SPOTTER

NEW JERSEY

...PASSAIC COUNTY...
HAWTHORNE 1.37 300 PM 7/18 SPOTTER

...BERGEN COUNTY...
BERGENFIELD 1.75 1215 PM 7/18 SPOTTER

...ESSEX COUNTY...
NEWARK 0.38 200 PM 7/18


CONNECTICUT

...FAIRFIELD COUNTY...
BRIDGEPORT 0.52 400 PM 7/18



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hurricanff
post Jul 18 2010, 10:15 AM
Post #1066




Rank: Whirlwind
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Beck
post Jul 21 2010, 07:31 PM
Post #1067




Rank: F5 Superstorm
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From: Temecula, California
Member No.: 19,931





QUOTE
On this day in... (07/18)

1922: 7.10 inches of rain fell in Campo.

1954: A northward moving hurricane made landfall in central Baja California with the remnants moving into Arizona. Rainfall of up to two inches occurred in the mountains and deserts starting on 7.17 and ending on 7.19. This occurred during the El Niño of 1953-54.

1960: It was 100° in Idyllwild, the latest date with a 100-degree reading of the season (the earliest 100-degree reading of the season occurred on 7.9.2002, making a window of only ten days).

1984: 1.80 inches of rain fell in Big Bear Lake, the greatest daily amount on record for July.

1987: A rare cold air mass for mid-summer descended on the region starting on this day and ending on 7.21 and broke numerous low temperature records. It was 56° in Borrego Springs, the lowest temperature on record for July.
It was 39° in Palomar Mountain, the lowest temperature on record for July. This also occurred two and three days later on 7.20 and 7.21.

2005: It was 94° in Big Bear Lake, the highest temperature on record. This also occurred on 7.15.1998 and 7.15.1972.


QUOTE
On this day in... (07/19)

1954: A northward moving hurricane made landfall in central Baja California with the remnants moving into Arizona. Rainfall of up to two inches occurred in the mountains and deserts starting on 7.17 and ending on this day. This occurred during the El Niño of 1953-54.

1955: Heavy thunderstorms struck desert areas of Twentynine Palms and Barstow. One cloudburst hit Cherry Valley with three inches of rain in 30 minutes. A 75 foot stream of water crossed Highway 66 at Hodge, southwest of Barstow. Washouts were also reported around Twentynine Palms.

1985: Strong thunderstorms produced very heavy rainfall in the mountains and the adjacent desert. A mudslide at the top of the Palm Springs Tram trapped 150, all but 31 were rescued by helicopter. The 31 spent the night because the helicopter was grounded due to unsafe winds. The 15 minute slide was a debris flow carrying huge rocks and timbers. A thunderstorm plunged a light aircraft to the ground at Mormon Rocks, killing a family of three. Flooding was reported “all over” in the Morongo Basin. A tornado in Needles hit a mobile home park and injured six. It leveled four mobile homes and damaged 14 others. 1.50 inches of rain fell in Palomar Mountain, the greatest daily amount on record for July. 2.36 inches fell in Cuyamaca, flooding Paso Picacho Campground.

1987: A rare cold air mass for mid-summer descended on the region starting on 7.18 and ending on 7.21 and broke numerous low temperature records.

2009: Severe thunderstorm winds struck La Quinta foothills with gusts measuring 61 mph.


QUOTE
On this day in... (07/20)

1974: A tornado in Hemet caused property damage.

1979: Thunderstorms hit Southern California, especially hard in the Coachella Valley and surrounding mountains. 1.92 inches of rain fell in Idyllwild and 1.29 inches fell in Borrego Springs, each the greatest daily amount on record for July. 2.50 inches fell in Palm Springs, 1.10 inches fell in Palomar Mountain and 1.09 inches fell in Big Bear Lake. Around Palm Desert and Rancho Mirage a debris flow killed one and caused $7 million damage. Flash flooding hit hundreds of homes in Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert and La Quinta. Some residents were swept out of their homes during the night.

1987: A rare cold air mass for mid-summer descended on the region starting on 7.18 and ending on 7.21 and broke numerous low temperature records. It was 39° in Palomar Mountain, the lowest temperature on record for July. This also occurred two days previous on 7.18 and on the next day 7.21.

1998: Heavy thunderstorms caused flooding at Mission Beach and at Barton Flats in the San Bernardino Mountains. Lightning sparked at least five fires in San Diego County. Strikes also hit a Clairemont home, and two trees in Pacific Beach. Lightning also caused a few power outages.

2008: A rare early morning thunderstorm hit the Coachella Valley. On the edge of the storm in Cathedral City, 1.25 inches fell in 30 minutes. 15 to 20 businesses and several homes were damaged at a trailer home park. Highway 111 was closed because of mud and rocks.


QUOTE
On this day in... (07/21)

1902: A dying tropical cyclone brought two inches of rain to the mountains and deserts of Southern California during a very strong El Niño event of 1901-02.

1965: It was 32° in Big Bear Lake, the latest freezing temperature for the season on record.

1987: A rare cold air mass for mid-summer descended on the region starting on 7.18 and ending on this day and broke numerous low temperature records. It was 39° in Palomar Mountain, the lowest temperature on record for July. This also occurred three days previous on 7.18 and the previous day on 7.20.

1999: Heavy thunderstorms hit the Borrego Springs area causing flash flood damage at Borrego Springs and Ocotillo Wells. A tornado hit Shelter Valley causing property damage.


--------------------
Temecula Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 0.88" (-1.00")
Normal to-date precipitation: 1.88"
Season began July 1st, 2014.

My Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 1.22"

Temecula Weather Pages
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Seiche
post Jul 22 2010, 07:00 PM
Post #1068




Rank: Tornado
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Joined: 27-May 10
From: Quincy, IL
Member No.: 22,864





July 21, 2008-Iowa/Illinois/QCA derecho.
DVN event archive summary.
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/dvn/?n=ev20080720wind
Anthony Peoples' blog retrospective.
http://www.wqad.com/news/opinion/wqad-blog...232989.htmlpage
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Seiche
post Jul 22 2010, 07:10 PM
Post #1069




Rank: Tornado
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Member No.: 22,864





July 2006 St. Louis regional MCS/bow echo event. Massive power outage coupled with heatwave. The new Busch stadium realizes it would be a good idea to bolt down their brand new heavy stadium garbage cans after seeing them become missiles during this event! wink.gif

http://www.crh.noaa.gov/lsx/?n=july_2006
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Beck
post Jul 22 2010, 07:32 PM
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Rank: F5 Superstorm
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From: Temecula, California
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On this day in...

1902: A dying tropical cyclone brought two inches of rain to the mountains and deserts of Southern California during a very strong El Niño event of 1901-02.

1960: A lightning storm sparked 24 fires in the San Bernardino Mountains. Strong thunderstorm winds snapped off telephone poles near Barstow. A thunderstorm produced a debris flow near Forest Home (now Forest Falls). One care was caught in the mud.

1966: A tornado touched down in Victorville.

1968: A heavy thunderstorm struck Needles with 1.50 inches of rain. Flash flooding damaged numerous buildings, streets and highways.

1986: Lightning struck Carlsbad, injuring six men. Lightning struck two homes in Rancho Peñaquitos and in Scripps Ranch, where a chimney was damaged. A 30 minute hailstorm in Mt. Laguna produced 1.55 inches of precipitation. The marble size hail stripped leaves off oak trees. Lightning and wind caused sporadic power outages.

2006: A major heat wave with humidity, in some ways unprecedented, hit Southern California. It was 121° in Palm Springs, 120° at Indio and Thermal, 114° at Ontario and the Wild Animal Park, and 113° at El Cajon. It was 112° at Escondido and 109° in La Mesa; both were highest temperatures on record. The 112° reading in Escondido beat the old record of 111° on 9.6.1955. Record high minimum temperatures were recorded in most places. Desert locations reported the all-time warmest month on record and a few locations west of the mountains (such as San Diego) did not drop below 70° all month. Sea surface temperatures hit 80°. Many were killed from the heat, and many more were treated for heat related illnesses. Some power outages occurred. Strong thunderstorm winds hit Lake Elsinore and blew down a 40 foot tree.


--------------------
Temecula Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 0.88" (-1.00")
Normal to-date precipitation: 1.88"
Season began July 1st, 2014.

My Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 1.22"

Temecula Weather Pages
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Beck
post Jul 23 2010, 01:17 PM
Post #1071




Rank: F5 Superstorm
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On this day in...

1948: Thunderstorms in Palm Desert and La Quinta flooded homes. Erosion damaged roads and canals. 2.80 inches of rain fell in Palm Springs, the greatest daily amount on record for July.

1956: Strong monsoon flow hit the region with thunderstorms each day from this day to 7.28, even west of the mountains. On this day water two feet deep covered spots in Apple Valley. Many dry desert lakes were filled.

2006: Strong thunderstorm winds hit Menifee. Numerous trees were blown down, some of which fell on homes. Lightning sparked the Coyote Fire southeast of Anza, which burned 460 acres.


--------------------
Temecula Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 0.88" (-1.00")
Normal to-date precipitation: 1.88"
Season began July 1st, 2014.

My Seasonal Precipitation 2014-2015: 1.22"

Temecula Weather Pages
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CentralIllinois
post Aug 10 2010, 07:41 PM
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Rank: F5 Superstorm
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From: Mount Zion, IL
Member No.: 14,540





NWS LINCOLN:
QUOTE
August 10, 1974
Severe thunderstorms triggered many tornadoes across central Illinois; 13 touchdowns were reported in Macon County alone, but only minor damage was reported. Tornadoes also touched down near Litchfield, Mattoon, and Effingham.


--------------------



QUOTE
WCIA_dfabert Forecast is much more believeable! Notice that the legend has changed! #cILwx

^
After 1 model run



2013-2014
# of Severe Thunderstorm Watches: 4
# of Severe Thunderstorm Warnings:3
# of Tornado Watches:0
# of Tornado Warnings:1

2013-2014 Snowfall:42.8"
2012-2013 Snowfall: 24.4"


Note to Accuweather.com....Please give us a dedicated video blogger for the Plains/MW/OV/GL area!
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Sagebrusher
post Nov 10 2010, 09:04 AM
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WOW what a blizzard! From the Davenport NWS website http://www.crh.noaa.gov/dvn/?n=armistice_day_blizzard (interestingly, Lacrosse has a different writeup)


Remembering the Armistice Day Blizzard of 1940

The blizzard that struck the Midwest in November 1940 was the type of snow storm that engenders legends. Fall was extremely mild and across the Upper Midwest temperatures were well above normal on the morning of November 11th. So warm that at 7:30 in the morning the temperature at Chicago was 55 degrees Fahrenheit, and at Davenport Iowa the temperature was 54. Armistice Day 1940 was a perfect opportunity for many individuals to enjoy the mild respite before winter. Little did they know the most infamous duck hunt in American history was about to unfold. When the storm exited the region over a foot of snow had fallen, and more than 150 people and thousands of livestock were dead.


Historical Background

Weather observations, forecasts and warnings were much different in 1940 and so were the ways people received information. Until 1934 the Weather Bureau offices operated 12-15 hours a day with two basic observations taken at 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. The observations were transmitted via telegraph. There were no satellite images and few upper air observations. In the Midwest the Chicago District issued weather forecasts for Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Weather Bureau forecasts, which were issued mid morning and mid evening, were brief and general. Distribution methods ranged from reports in newspapers, on cards displayed in the lobbies of public buildings, radio broadcasts, or by telegraph. Cold wave warnings which were prepared for citrus fruit growers, cranberry, tobacco interests, and iron ore shippers were based upon forecasters recognizing a particular weather pattern and its potential effect. Weather Bureau offices in cities like Davenport and Dubuque provided weather observations which were sent to the district offices via teletype.

A wealth of weather observational records which had been accumulated since the 1800’s were basically underutilized until computers improved the ability to record and retrieve data. During the modernization of 1934 card punching of weather data began and phone calls to Weather Bureau offices increased to about 100 phone requests a day for climate information (Whitnah, 1961). In 1938 a “breakfast forecast” was introduced, and predictions were revised four times a day (4 a.m. & 4 p.m., 10 a.m. & 10 p.m.). For rural communities weather information was limited, but certainly available, since it was common for telephone operators and carriers on rural free delivery mail routes to distribute this information (Whitnah, 1961). In 1940 long range forecasting was introduced. Thjs longer forecast, which covered 5 days and which was issued twice a week, was based upon upper air pressure data and correlated with past weather patterns (Whitnah, 1961).



The Story Before the Story

A few days earlier a strong weather system moving into the Pacific Northwest had taken down the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. Until the collapse on November 7, 1940 the bridge had been the 3rd longest suspension span in the world. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge, an engineering wonder, had already acquired the name Galloping Gertie due to its motion in the wind. A four mile an hour breeze could start oscillations in the bridge while stronger breezes often had no effect. On November 7, 1940 winds of 35 to 45 mph caused center span to undulate 3-5 feet and the bridge failed before the center of the storm system reached shore. On November 8, 1940 storm center remained off the Washington coast producing gale force winds. Meanwhile pressure was falling over the Pacific Northwest.

By November 10th the storm system had moved across the Rocky Mountains to redevelop over Trinidad Colorado (Knarr, 1941). Initially the system pushed east then it curved northward into the central United States where it would leave a path of icy destruction. During the next 6 hours the storm center moved to vicinity of Iowa Falls, Iowa. West of the center blizzards raged across South Dakota and a widespread ice storm across Nebraska left hundreds of people impacted by the storm. East of the center a broad swath of warm air streamed up the Mississippi Valley.


In the Quad Cities people awoke to balmy temperatures on November 11th. It had rained overnight and early morning temperatures were in the 50s (Swails, 2005). Many businesses and schools were closed due to the Armistice Day holiday; and duck hunters were pleased by the opportunity to take to the fields and streams. Few suspected the weather was about to change.

During the day and into the night severe weather erupted across much of the Midwest. A tornado was reported one mile west of Davenport Iowa, 2-3 inches of heavy rain fell over the Mississippi Valley, and heavy snow began to fall across Minnesota and Western Iowa. Gale velocities were measured at 80 mph at Grand Rapids, Michigan, and were estimated to be even higher over the lakes. By the time the storm was centered over Lake Superior the barometer reading was 28.57 inches of mercury.
The People

Hunters taking advantage of the holiday and extremely mild weather were rewarded with an overabundance of waterfowl. Many would later comment that they had never seen so many birds, but the birds knew something most of the hunters didn’t. They were getting out of the way of an approaching storm.

Across the Midwest hundreds of duck hunters, not dressed for the cold, were overtaken by the storm. Winds came suddenly then masses of ducks arrived flying low to the ground (Washburn, 2008). Hunters, awed by the site of unending flocks of birds, failed to recognize the impending weather signs that a change was in process. Rain started and temperatures fell rapidly. By the time the rain, sleet, then heavy snow reduced the visibility to zero, hunters lost their opportunities to return safely to shore. Hundreds of duck hunters lost boats, gear and guns as 15 foot swells and 70 -80 mph winds swept down channels and marshy backwaters. Some hunters drowned, others froze to death when the near 60 degree temperatures plummeted, first to freezing, then into the single digits (Knarr, 1941; Swails, 2005; Washburn, 2008).

During the next few days search parties retrieved frozen hunters from islands and the icy waters. Some of those lucky enough be stranded on islands survived the storm, but lost hands or feet due to severe frost bite.

Transportation and Infrastructure

Across the upper Midwest drifts up to 20 feet high buried cars and rescuers had to force long probes into the rock hard drifts in their search for missing people. Passenger trains were stranded, and roads and highways remained closed for days. Newspaper deliveries were halted; telephone and power lines were damaged as were homes, barns, and outbuildings in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, and Michigan.

Historians note storms were responsible for many shipwrecks, and November storms were known to strike with incredible fury (Oosting, 2008). In spite of this there was a tremendous incentive for ships to go out during the most dangerous season for their cargoes of coal, grain, and crops were in great demand (Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum, 2009). Food supplies were needed to get through the winter, and coal was essential for heating. Mariners, aware of the dangers on the Great Lakes, paid close attention to the weather. But during the Armistice Day storm many of the crews were unaware that the winds would shift until their ships were struck broadside by the full force of the wind. During the storm three large ships sank near Pentwater, Michigan and 58 lives were lost. Survivors on ships that ran aground waited for days on their damaged vessels until winds subsided and rescue boats could be launched from shore. Communities expecting the cargos for their winter supplies were significantly impacted by the loss of food and fuel (Oosting, 2008).

The Destruction of an Industry

Before the Armistice Day Blizzard of 1940 the state of Iowa was a leading fruit growing region, second only to Michigan in apple production. As the storm’s center passed near Winterset Iowa, a ferocious ice storm delivered a devastating blow to the apple industry. Icy winds killed hundreds of apple trees, and planting a new orchard was expensive. In 1940 the threat of war was growing and the nation was preparing for hard times. If trees were planted it would be years before they would be capable of producing fruit. The economic impacts to apple growers were so significant that the landscape across Iowa was permanently changed when orchards were transformed into fields of faster growing crops like corn and soybeans (Friese, 2008).

Implications for Today

Operational meteorology is both a physical and social science. Meteorologically the Armistice Day Storm is noteworthy for its rapid intensification and widespread damage. During the storm low pressure deepened 1-2 millibars per hour over a 24 hour time period. The storm system spawned severe weather including tornadoes, wind, extreme winter weather, and blizzard conditions across the central United States. Studies and reports following the storm helped change the face of forecasting, for this storm strengthened support to keep weather offices open 24 hours a day.

The Armistice Day Storm remains noteworthy to society because it was a seminal event that continues to impact humans. Anything that endures as part of a culture from one generation to another is considered a seminal event; and the societal impacts of such an event can change lives and change history. The consequences of societal impact alter the ways in which people live, work, play, relate to one another, organize to meet their needs and generally cope as members of society. Forecasters must assess the potential for societal impacts when they strive to understand the atmospheric environment, timing of an event, and the social environment in their warning areas. Any event with the potential for folk-lore will produce societal impact.

The longer we accumulate weather records the more likely we are to find extreme weather events. An assessment of societal impacts has the potential to help individuals and communities understand and anticipate possible social consequences of an event in regards to human populations. It is becoming standard practice to weave social science into weather and climate research (Gruntfest & Lazrus, 2009). Over time public perceptions are changed partly due to massive growth in media coverage, but also because real-time media with gripping images bring storm and disasters into our living rooms.

Generations have based their understanding of extreme winter weather against the storm that struck on Armistice Day 1940. Seventy years later the Armistice Day Blizzard remains the second most requested bit of information from the Minnesota State Climatologist office (Boulay, 2009). In Iowa this catastrophic event changed agricultural growing practices as apple growers switched from tending orchards to corn and soybean production. Evidence of the Armistice Day Blizzard is recorded in newspaper clippings, photos, museum collections, and stories of this event have been captured in cookbooks, journal articles, and passed on through family oral traditions. This storm produced an impact on society due to the death and destruction left in its wake. If one measures the impact of an event by the diversity of the information that remains this storm was indeed memorable.

Credit: Theresa Simmons, National Weather Service
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Sagebrusher
post Nov 10 2010, 09:25 AM
Post #1074




Rank: F5 Superstorm
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Posts: 518
Joined: 19-June 06
From: Iowa City IA
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Also, today is the 35th anniversary of the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald. Good article at CNN. http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/11/09/edmund.fi...dex.html?hpt=C1

The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
Of the big lake they call Gitche Gumee
The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead
When the skies of November turn gloomy.

With a load of iron ore - 26,000 tons more
Than the Edmund Fitzgerald weighed empty
That good ship and true was a bone to be chewed
When the gales of November came early

The ship was the pride of the American side
Coming back from some mill in Wisconsin
As the big freighters go it was bigger than most
With a crew and the Captain well seasoned.

Concluding some terms with a couple of steel firms
When they left fully loaded for Cleveland
And later that night when the ships bell rang
Could it be the North Wind they'd been feeling.

The wind in the wires made a tattletale sound
And a wave broke over the railing
And every man knew, as the Captain did, too,
T'was the witch of November come stealing.

The dawn came late and the breakfast had to wait
When the gales of November came slashing
When afternoon came it was freezing rain
In the face of a hurricane West Wind

When supper time came the old cook came on deck
Saying fellows it's too rough to feed ya
At 7PM a main hatchway caved in
He said fellas it's been good to know ya.

The Captain wired in he had water coming in
And the good ship and crew was in peril
And later that night when his lights went out of sight
Came the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

Does anyone know where the love of God goes
When the waves turn the minutes to hours
The searchers all say they'd have made Whitefish Bay
If they'd put fifteen more miles behind her.

They might have split up or they might have capsized
They may have broke deep and took water
And all that remains is the faces and the names
Of the wives and the sons and the daughters.

Lake Huron rolls, Superior sings
In the ruins of her ice water mansion
Old Michigan steams like a young man's dreams,
The islands and bays are for sportsmen.

And farther below Lake Ontario
Takes in what Lake Erie can send her
And the iron boats go as the mariners all know
With the gales of November remembered.

In a musty old hall in Detroit they prayed
In the Maritime Sailors' Cathedral
The church bell chimed, 'til it rang 29 times
For each man on the Edmund Fitzgerald.

The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
Of the big lake they call Gitche Gumee
Superior, they say, never gives up her dead
When the gales of November come early
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Sagebrusher
post Oct 24 2012, 01:44 PM
Post #1075




Rank: F5 Superstorm
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From: Iowa City IA
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*bump*

Check out the 1878 "Gale"
interesting track...



Wikipedia
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Undertakerson
post Oct 29 2012, 09:48 AM
Post #1076




Rank: F5 Superstorm
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Joined: 12-February 10
From: Blue Mtn, N of Hbg - Elev 1000'
Member No.: 21,746





On this day today October 29,2012

Historic Hurricane Sandy - destined to be a storm against which all others are measured.


--------------------
There are 2 types of people in this world. 1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data.
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