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> Green Lightning?, A phenomenon I saw only twice in 8 years
FunnelCloud
post Jun 10 2008, 02:06 PM
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Hey all--

Last night we had a severe t-storm with tons of lightning. To the north of me I observed brilliant green flashes of lightning among the clouds. It was very unusual, not your run-of-the-mill bright whitish/bluish/pinkish flashes. It also seemed to linger for several seconds. It was not a transformer blowing or anything like that, as it was too high up.

The only other time I saw green lightning was in a very severe storm about 8 years ago. I'd appreciate your thoughts on this.


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Tornado Boy
post Jun 11 2008, 01:20 AM
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QUOTE
Green Lightning?
Green/turquoise flashes and/or changing colors: A flash of light in the sky that lingers, pulses and/or changes colors is not lightning, but electrical arcing from shorted-out power lines. These arcs are called 'power flashes' and can be triggered by a variety of severe weather - including ice storms, high winds, tornadoes, or by a direct lightning strike. Electrical arcing, whether caused by lightning, ice or wind damage, is very intense, can be as bright as lightning, can illuminate the entire sky and can change color from blue, green, turquoise, red and orange. When lightning strikes an energized power line, an electrical flashover arc can result. Lightning-triggered flashover arcs usually begin during the strike and linger for a few seconds after the strike is over. See our article about flashover arcs for a more in-depth look.
Power flashes are often incorrectly referred to as 'exploding transformers'. Only a few power flashes are actually transformer explosions - most are caused by shorted-out lines due to broken, crisscrossed or fallen wires.


Source: http://wvlightning.com/faqw10.shtml


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FunnelCloud
post Jun 11 2008, 04:37 PM
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Thanks for the link smile.gif Lots of good info. on that site. It's kinda scary to think those were power lines lighting up during that storm. I'm glad I didn't lose power!


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Tornado Boy
post Jun 11 2008, 11:55 PM
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No problem, anything I can do to help smile.gif


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Kelly_Thunderclo...
post Jun 13 2008, 03:10 AM
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I don't know if that can explain what I saw in a storm last August. I know it was lightning because I saw the bolts and thunder followed every flash. It was also very frequent and in many places around the sky - just like lightning. It lasted throughout the whole storm. It wasn't green, but it was blue! It was a very distinct blue lightning. The actual bolts appeared white, but the flashes around the sky were always blue. Sometimes the bolt and sound were simultaneous so I knew the strikes were very nearby. It was a typical strong thunderstorm with much lightning, but all of it was blue! If you picture your typical royal blue, that's what it was.

I also had another experience of what I call "The orange storm". This I think I can explain because the storm took place at sunset and I think somehow the refraction caused all the clouds and everything to appear orange - including the lightning.

But I have no idea how to explain the blue one! Any thoughts?


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tdp146
post Jun 24 2008, 09:56 AM
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QUOTE(Tornado Boy @ Jun 11 2008, 02:20 AM) *


good find.. That was actually my first thought when you mentioned green flashes. I remember seeing a very similar sight when I was in Florida on the East coast when hurricane Charlie passed through. Green flashes lighting up the whole sky every few mins in the distance. There was no lightning associated with the hurricane and the flashes were all coming from exploding electrical transformers. The transformers could not compensate for the extra electrical load that they had to take on when a power line went down and the electricity was re-routed through the transformer.


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